ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

XenophobiaSubscribe to Xenophobia

Caste and Race: Discrimination Based on Descent

In 2001, Dalit non-governmental organisations pushed for the inclusion of caste-based discrimination in the United Nations conference on racism and other forms of descent-based discriminations. How did the Government of India respond to the internationalisation of casteism? Why did Dalits want casteism to be treated on par with racism in the first place? Did they succeed? And above all, is caste the same as race?

Brexit is Not Just about Exiting the European Union: A Reading List

The United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union is indicative of not only its own narrow self-perception but also of the rise of an anti-immigration and racist stance put forth by right-wing groups. */ */

Looking Back at Donald Trump’s Presidency: A Reading List

As Donald Trump’s presidency comes to a close, a reexamination of his domestic and foreign policy reveals a fractured legacy—of populism, protectionism and unilateralism.

Coerced Movements and the Unravelling of a ‘People’

There is an increasing acknowledgement of the intertwining nature of voluntary and forced migration. Also, there is an increase in xenophobic and ethnic tensions accompanied by the rise of populist politics, as migrants get labelled as others and outsiders. There is a need to take cognisance of the...

Who is to Blame for the Refugee Crisis?

The refugee crisis that the world is currently facing is a long-term effect of colonialism.

Decoding Donald Trump

Donald Trump epitomises deeper fault lines and contradictions that bedevil America's image of itself. It is symptomatic of a populism that travels for the most part across party lines and political affiliations. Democratic candidates have also resorted to a softer populism on the idea of the foreigner intruding into sacred national territory.

Implications of American Islamophobia

The remarks of the United States presidential hopeful, Donald Trump, on Muslims in America have caused outrage all over the world and have led many to say that Trump is going against what the country stands for. The present rash of Islamophobia is, however, only the latest example of a deep vein of racism and xenophobia that runs through mainstream American society.

Muslims and Others: Anecdotes, Fragments and Uncertainties of Evidence

Against the intensified communalisation of civil society and the emergence of new modes of racism in contemporary India, this essay juxtaposes different histories of the Other through critical insights into the construction and demonisation of the Indian Muslim, along with subaltern performers and indigenous people, among other minorities. Working through anecdotes and fragments, bits and pieces of history, and the backstage life of theatre, this disjunctive discourse on the Other attempts to trouble liberal assumptions of cultural identity by calling attention to the uncertainties of evidence by which ethnic identities are politicised in diverse ways. While critiquing the exclusionary mode of 'othering' minorities, the essay also calls attention to more internalised modes of disidentification and the double-edged benefits of political identity for the underprivileged and dispossessed, whose own assertions of the self invariably complicate official identitarian constructions.

Migration to Democratic South Africa

Since the 19th century, South Africa's economy has been sustained by the migration of cheap labour from neighbouring countries. But the end of apartheid, the consequent search for a new national identity and the accompanying tensions of a nation in transition have also fuelled deep suspicion and hostility against such migrants, who are now viewed increasingly as 'aliens'.

Sonia Gandhi’s Nationality: Politics and Xenophobia

A constructive political criticism of Sonia Gandhi and her style of politics can only be predicated upon whether Congress, under her leadership, can emerge as the pivot of a liberal consensus in opposition to BJP's conservative consensus, not an xenophobia.
Back to Top