ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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‘Health for All’ in Neo-liberal Times

Striving for Equity: Healthcare in Sri Lanka from Independence to the Millennium, 1948–2000 by Margaret Jones, Hyderabad: Orient BlackSwan, 2020; pp xiii+ 259, `790.

COVID-19: Lessons from a Knowable Unknown

Since December 2019, the world has been combating a biological enemy—COVID-19. This article looks at how we arrived at this point and how we must be better prepared to battle the next Disease x, as the World Health Organization calls it.

Diabetes Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies

Awareness about risk factors is a prerequisite for the prevention of diabetes mellitus amongst diabetic patients. A questionnaire-based survey of diabetic patients adapted from “WHO-STEPS Surveillance” was performed during 2018 in Punjab, using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. The overall awareness level was found to be 83%, but perception and comprehension regarding risk factors and prevention strategies are still at a nascent stage. There is need for innovative awareness programmes and government campaigns on the consequences of lifestyle modification, sedentary lifestyle, and altering epidemiology of diabetes.

United States to Quit World Health Organization: What Does It Mean for the World?

President Donald Trump has recently announced that the United States will pull out of the World Health Organization, after accusing the global body of being biased towards China in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it appears that without the US, WHO would be weakened in terms of its significance and resources at its command, the fact remains that, in reality, it bodes well for the democratic functioning of WHO without the intimidating presence of a global superpower.

Vector Control Operations to Deal with Malaria

Although India had some successes in controlling malaria from the time of independence, it still faces a substantial socio-economic burden from this disease. This paper presents a case study of a highly endemic primary health centre with an annual parasite incidence of 30.9 in the tribal regions of Andhra Pradesh. It reviews the various operations involved in vector control methods like bed nets, insecticide spraying and anti-larval operations. Based on the data available with the health functionaries and household level surveys, it makes operational suggestions to improve the efficacy of control measures. It finds that the current focus is heavily skewed towards surveillance for malaria-affected patients with inadequate attention for vector control methods of malaria prevention. Ensuring the adoption of vector control methods by the community will yield rich dividends in curtailing the malarial transmission process.
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