ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Water managementSubscribe to Water management

Sustainable Use of Water

Projections of water demand and supply based on various scenarios provide a backdrop for examining the relevance of alternative interventions to achieve sustainable use of India's water resources. Policy interventions in the water sector need to address the conservation and better use of water by correcting instruments that have resulted in inefficient use of water and pollution of water bodies. Adoption of such interventions must involve a wider dialogue within civil society and a study of the knowledge available from around the world.

Developing Sinecures

Water User Associations in Andhra Pradesh by Jasveen Jairath; Concept Publishing Company, New Delhi (published for Centre for Economic and Social Studies, Hyderabad), 2001; pp 156; Rs 250.

Water Management and Village Groups

Despite the government's repeated assertions in recent years on the need for a decentralised, people-oriented and demand driven water management, these have not been converted into implementable solutions. While policy initiatives exist with regard to water user associations, watershed associations, and legal strategies are a much-needed prerequisite in order to evolve statisfactory working relationships between local bodies institutions and networks of formal and informal village groups engaged in water management.

Ensuring Access to Water in Urban Households

This paper deals with how urban Indian households obtain water for their daily requirements. The link between economic status and access allows the analysis of issues such as water sharing, sole access, ability to pay, need for improvements, etc. The authors also put forth a strategy for levying user charges for different economic status households. The data reveal that poor access is accompanied with low levels of expectations of the populace. The paper stresses the need for a substantial consumer awareness campaign before embarking on any improvement programme.

Conflict in Resource Management for Ecosystem Services

Water supplied free to urban centres imposes costs on the upland watershed. The paper analyses the conflicts and costs of such provision of external ecosystem services in a case in Yunnan, China. It argues that in order to internalise the external costs of such water supply, there should be a locally embedded system of forest management. It further argues that pricing of these external ecosystem products, like water, is needed to enable local communities to balance the benefits from their sale against costs and other benefits.

Managing Water

Planning and Management of Water Resources: Lessons from Two Decades of Early Implementation Projects, Bangladesh edited by Anjan K Datta; The University Press, Dhaka, 1999; pp xxiii + 172, Taka 450.
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