ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

VillageSubscribe to Village

Understanding the Potentialities

This ethnographic study of Dalit women from the villages of Allahabad district assesses their identification with Dalit politics, the impact that the Bahujan Samaj Party has had on their political and social aspirations, and what makes them identify with Mayawati.

Migration, Bachelorhood and Discontent among the Patidars

Juxtaposing data collected in the 1950s with data from 2013, this paper describes some of the consequences of a crisis of agriculture in India as a crisis of values and aspirations. Among a relatively prosperous Patidar community in western India, agriculture continues to be economically remunerative while farmers are considered poor. Instead, the ability to secure a job away from land, to move out of the village and possibly overseas have come to constitute new markers of status in a traditionally competitive society. The paper departs from common representations of the caste as an upwardly mobile and successful group, and focuses instead on the discontent and on those who try to achieve the new values of the caste, but fail. As a consequence of failure it shows how Patidars recur to what, from an outsider's point of view, may seem paradoxical: in order to "move up" and participate in the culture and economy of the caste, they have to "move down." In this respect, the paper also contributes to understanding the unevenness of India's growth and the contrary trends that work both to strengthen and weaken caste identity.

Inequality in Rural Nagaland

Tribal villages are usually perceived to be the egalitarian counterparts to villages in India that are ruled by hierarchical caste structures. Taking the case of Ao Naga villages, clan rank and class are found to be important for understanding the changing structures of inequality. Today, these villages are deeply integrated into the larger milieus: politics, administration, education and the market economy. The social mechanisms responsible for inequality are now to a large degree centred outside the village, and living in a village has become almost identical with a lower social status. One result of this process is that instead of clan ranks, the access to outside resources forms the basis of social inequality within the village. Based on secondary sources as well as original fieldwork, an account of how this integration leads to class differentiations at the village level is presented.

Water Stress in Indian Villages

A survey of the magnitude of water-related stress in Indian villages and its effect on rural life, conducted in four districts across the country highlights numerous problems of availability, accessibility and quality of water. The complementarities in water and other areas such as hygiene, education and agriculture have to be tapped and collaborative efforts made to mitigate water stress.

Medical University:Failure and Opportunity

With the recent announcement delinking medical colleges from the newly-founded Maharashtra University of Health Sciences (MUHS), an ill-planned exercise plagued by petty politics has come to a costly end. But this might just be the opportunity to create relevant training and educational resources for village/slum level health care through the MUHS and bring about a radical change in the health sector.

Opening Basic Telephone Service to Competition

The primary objective of deregulating telecommunications is to attract investment so that there is an abundance of telecommunications and they become more and more affordable to an ever larger section of the people. Enhancement of consumer choice is another objective. If a consumer is not satisfied with one service-provider, he has the option to go to another.
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