ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Multidimensional Poverty as an Instrument of Programmatic Intervention

Conceptual and operational issues for constructing multidimensional poverty indices in India are discussed and the possibilities of its application for strategic interventions are examined in this article. It argues that questions concerning the selection of indicators, data sources, weightages, threshold limits, etc, have to be addressed through a consultative process, keeping it above the short-term politics of the regime.

Human Capital or Human Development?

This paper compares human capital theory with the capability approach and lays out the problems with the theory. As a knowledge paradigm for education and development, it finds the theory wanting. However, it has remained the foundation for sectoral work in education and health by international financial institutions. The paper spells out the problems, historically, with World Bank lending in the education sector, some of which follow from human capital theory, while others follow from a broader neoliberal agenda. It concludes by delineating the foundational elements of an alternative knowledge paradigm for ?education for all?, based on the capability approach and its extension.

Community, Organisation and Representation

Social science literature and development practice has together discovered the rural community as the 'site' for development. This presupposes the rural community as a monolithic and undifferentiated entity. Local traditions point to a different direction- and need to be better grasped so as to enrich both social science literature and development practice. This becomes even more relevant, given the increasingly critical role of membership organisations in local development initiatives and in an overall scenario when the relevance of political action has been brought back in the cause of development.

Technology for All

Since 1990 the human development index, although much discussed and sharply criticised and despite its many problems, has become an accepted measure for determining relative development. Subsequent Human Development Reports (HDR) have introduced other measures, gender empowerment measure, gender-related development index, and human poverty index, each of which has provided a tool for assessing various components of social development.

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