ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Livelihood Vulnerabilities of Tribals during COVID-19

The imposition of lockdown and COVID-19 has disturbed the life of tribals and forest dwellers by destroying their livelihood and health. The article argues that there is an urgent need to focus on food security and strong social protection mechanisms to help tribal communities to minimise the impact of the pandemic on their social and economic life.

'Brighter Side' of Seasonal Migration

The paper is based on field surveys of two locations of rural West Bengal during the1990s. It presents contrasting scenarios of fertility behaviour and its transition for a tribe, namely Santals, between two locations as well as between Santals and lower caste people in the same village. The Santals of Chitrihutu, who migrate seasonally, evince not only low fertility, but they indeed appear far ahead of non-migrating Santals of Thupsara in terms of contraceptive practices and fertility control. The positive role of seasonal migration in hastening fertility transition has been the central message of the present study.

The Chipko Movement Reconsidered

Of Myths and Movements: Rewriting Chipko in the Himalayan History by Haripriya Rangan; OUP, 2001, (first published by Verso, 2000); pp 272 + xvi, Rs 595

Displacement and Rehabilitation of an Adivasi Settlement

This paper describes the process of relocation and rehabilitation of villages populated primarily by sahariya tribals in Sheopur district of Madhya Pradesh. It examines the rehabilitation package offered, the process followed for relocation and resettlement and the impact that this shift has had on the livelihood of the affected people. While the rehabilitation package and the general attitude of the agency that carried out the relocation has been a significant improvement over previous such experiences, the shift has nevertheless had a negative impact on the livelihood of the people, at least in the short run.

Social Capital and Collective Action

With the retreat of the interventionist state, development is often perceived as a product of partnership between the state and civil society with increasing emphasis on people's participation at the grass roots. Using a framework of collective action based upon social capital, this paper examines whether social capital is important for successful development outcomes at the grass roots in forest protection and watershed development. Three villages of Adilabad district in Andhra Pradesh are the focus of the study.
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