ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Tamil NaduSubscribe to Tamil Nadu

Voice of the Unorganised Sector

The march of thousands of unorganised sector workers in Tamil Nadu has brought to the fore the plight of this huge, neglected workforce and helped raise some of their long-pending demands.

Tamil Nadu: 'Samathuvapuram': Towards Spatial Equality

The concept of housing communities, where dalits and people of other castes live together in mixed neighbourhoods and share all facilities - focuses for the first time on social and cultural equality in housing programmes. The plan itself germinated in response to recurrent caste and communal clashes in the state and has received considerable acceptance among the public.

Discouraging Multiple Memberships

The Constitution is silent with respect to the holding of dual membership in local bodies such as the panchayats and municipalities and/or in state/union legislatures.

Vanniyar Separatism

The vanniyars' case for a separate state stands on loose ground. The movement, nevertheless draws attention to the current absence of a rallying point for a caste-based party in the context of the strengthening multi-caste, multi-party nature of electoral politics.

Economic Programmes and Poverty Reduction

This paper analyses the impact of the economic programmes of SHARE, an NGO in Tamil Nadu, on poverty reduction, with the help of data collected from the households of 84 women members. The economic programmes contributed to savings and income increase for the women. However, the member group was not found to be significantly different from the comparison group in terms of control over income and decision-making.

Putting Gujarat in Perspective

Overshadowed by the recent horrific events in Gujarat is a wider shift in Indian politics that is likely to reduce the country's level of communal violence: growing party competition in the states increases the incentives for politicians to offer minorities protection in return for their political support. High levels of party competition have long been effective in reducing violence for this reason in southern states such as Tamil Nadu and Kerala. The rise elsewhere in India of parties such as the BSP and SP also creates intense competition for Muslim votes, which in turn leads to politicians promising - and delivering - greater security for minorities.

Child Labour in Tamil Nadu in the 1980s

This paper sifts certain important sources of secondary data, in its efforts to present certain broad descriptive features of the phenomenon of child labour in Tamil Nadu and its distribution across well-defined socio-economic groups classified by gender, sector-of-origin and caste, and its dispersal across space. As NSS data for 1987-88 suggest, the magnitude of child labour in Tamil Nadu appears disturbingly large, with nearly 11 children out of every 100 in the workforce. Tragically, this very large presence of orderly, systematic child labour and child illiteracy, together with their thorough dispersal across space, has rendered the phenomenon of child labour an unremarkable, everyday occurrence. The concerns of society and the state remain limited to certain specific occupations in certain specific locations, to the neglect of other occupations and locations which merit at least equal attention.

Tamil Nadu : Civic Elections: Politics from Above

While the regrouping of the DMK and the AIADMK alliances and the two incidents - the dramatic arrest of M Karunanidhi and the installation of Jayalalitha to the chief minister's post - may well have influenced voting patterns, essentially, it is the change in character of politics that has determined the outcome. A case in point is the unexpectedly good showing of the BJP at the local level.

Sensitising Officials on Dalits and Reservations

Due to a lack of political will and sensitivity, implementation of the provisions for employment reservation for dalits has been far from satisfactory. In Tamil Nadu too, dalits have suffered from the lax approach of the state towards extending reservation benefits. If this situation has to be corrected several issues need to be urgently considered, including dalits' awareness of their rights, sensitising concerned groups, and above all investing in education so that dalits can reduce their dependence on the state in the quest for social equality.

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