ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Rethinking Indian Federalism

India is considered as a successful federation in resolving most of its ethno-regional and linguistic problems in favour of a relatively durable political order and stability through territorial as well as non-territorial recognition of identity. On the basis of a distinction between what has been termed “diversity claims” and “equality claims,” it is argued that India’s democratic success has remained a very poor match to its federal success. Democracy here has been pressed into the service of a kind of federalism that has privileged “diversity claims” over “equality claims.” Although India’s experiment with state creation within federalism remains ongoing, with Telangana being the latest one carved out of Andhra Pradesh in 2014, given the shifts in priorities since the onset of India’s reforms in 1991, political incentives for demanding more states do not appear to be as attractive as before. While equality claims played second fiddle to diversity claims, the scope of the former has become further restricted today.

Statehood for Delhi

The Supreme Court’s interpretation of Article 239-AA of the Constitution in Government of NCT of Delhi v Union of India has reaffirmed the centrality of representative democracy and federalism to India’s constitutional government. However, it has only restored an unhappy status quo as far as Delhi is concerned. The fault lies in Article 239-AA itself, an incomplete and unworkable division of powers and responsibilities that gives Delhi a lot of government, but little governance.

Debating Statehood

Debating Statehood Durable Disorder: Understanding the Politics of North-East India by Sanjib Baruah; OUP, New Delhi, 2005; PRADIP PHANJOUBAM This recent book by Sanjib Baruah is a departure from available literature on the problems of India

Uttarakhand: One Year After

One year on, expectations behind the creation of the state of Uttarakhand seem to have been largely belied. However, the emergence of 'popular' candidates, to contest the forthcoming elections, and their promise to set forth a new trajectory of politics - one based on meeting the state's immediate concerns of land, water and forests - spells new hope for the hill state.

Political Reconstruction of Bangladesh-Reflections on Building a New State in the Seventies

This paper seeks to point out certain general lessons that we have learnt prom the last 25 years of experience in regard to state and nation building in the "Third World".
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