ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Dalit Women and Colonial Christianity

The paper focuses on the history of the first three Bible women, Mary Wesley, Martha Reuben, and Bathsheba, who came from marginalised communities in Rayalaseema, and emerged as new leaders of social change in the context of colonial modernity and Christianity in the region. The emergence of a modern profession of Bible woman for Dalit women in the 1870s was transformative, opening doors of education, learning, and transforming them into local leaders. Bible women played a pivotal role in the history of Dalits, gender, and missions by shaping the life and community of Dalits and spreading Christianity in Rayalaseema.

Not by Prosperity Alone

The Paradox of Rural Development in India: The Devapur Experience by Suresh Suratwala, Bhopal: Kishore Bharati, 2020; pp 197, ₹ 150 (paperback).

No Social Change sans Dialogue

The lack of dialogue between temple trustees, villagers, activists and other stakeholders over protests around the entry of women into the inner sanctum of the Shani temple in Shingnapur, Maharashtra has prevented any meaningful engagement with the myths, beliefs, and notions of purity. For progressive social change, dialogue, which was missing in this case, is the only way forward.

Breaking Free

Radio is an inexpensive medium in terms of production and management. It overcomes the limitations of literacy and is more appropriate for cultures dominated by orality. All over the third world radio has been a catalyst for social change. Although the state-owned public service broadcaster, All India Radio has turned 75, broadcasting in our country continues to be governed by archaic laws and uncompromising bureaucracy. Recent developments however may make for some loosening of the state's hold over radio, making room for alternatives in the form of popular, community-based media. This collection of five articles attempts to raise some critical questions related to broadcasting in India, with specific reference to community radio

Education as Vision for Social Change

Elementary Education for the Poorest and Other Disadvantaged Groups: The Real Challenge of Universalisation by Jyotsna Jha and Dhir Jhingran; Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, 2002; pp 255+ tables, price not indicated.

Community Radio

There are lessons to be learnt from the experiments in developing community run/owned radio in south Asia and outside. The Philippines has taken community radio to new heights and even tiny Nepal has opened up its community broadcasting, and in Sri Lanka community radio stations are owned by the state.

Promise of Citizens' Media

Community radio - the cheapest and most accessible of the electronic mass media - is ruled out in many countries because of legal restrictions. This paper looks at community radio in Australia and South Africa. Australia has a mature 'third tier' of broadcasting, now over 20 years old, facing the problems of an established sector, with consistent if relatively diminishing state support. As a relatively new democracy, South Africa's adoption of community radio is significant on a global scale. As the debate around community radio in India gathers momentum, and various initiatives start to emerge, some of the challenges they currently face may have lessons for India.

An Economic Analysis of Judicial Activism

Over time it is not just the rights of the 'socially excluded' that have been put up for judicial review and intervention; a whole gamut of issues such as the environment, consumer affairs, property rights, the practices of municipal corporations, educational institutions, politicians and political parties, to name a few areas, have been presented before the courts to prescribe public policy outcomes. This widening of subject matter has caused Indian judicial activism to be celebrated as a device of engineering social change. We propose an examination of judicial activism using the positive tools of economic analysis. The singular value of such an analysis lies in placing judicial activism in relation to the norm of economic efficiency. This enables a discussion in which one does not present the problem as one of contesting ideologies, but in terms of the impact of judicial activism on the allocation of resources. In the first section of the paper we outline the tools for the analysis. We establish a link between the doctrine of separation of powers and the notion of transaction costs and use this to define activism. In the second part we use the definition to perform a heuristic economic analysis of judicial activism. Our conclusions are mixed: while we see some virtue in what we call interpretational judicial activism, other forms of judicial activism that encroach on legislative or executive decision-making on grounds of privilege can result in social costs that outstrip benefits.

Indian Democracy, Positively Viewed

Culture and Rationality: The Politics of Social Change in PostColonial India by Subrata K Mitra; Sage Publications, New Delhi, 1999; Rs 525, pp 438.
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