ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Performance of Self-help Groups in India

Since its inception, the performance of the self-help group programme in the area of rural development and women’s empowerment has been admirable. But, although the programme is being implemented in many parts of the country, its success has been patchy. This study evaluates its performance during 2011–19. It focuses on two aspects of the programme’s performance: its geographical expansion and the growth of non-performing assets. It shows that the programme has been more successful in well-off states, while in the central and north-eastern regions, it faces severe difficulties. The mounting NPAs in these regions require immediate intervention.

Banking for the Poor

Bandhan: The Making of a Bank by Tamal Bandyopadhyay, Gurgaon: Penguin Books India, 2016; pp 304, ₹ 414.

Social Capital and Collective Action

With the retreat of the interventionist state, development is often perceived as a product of partnership between the state and civil society with increasing emphasis on people's participation at the grass roots. Using a framework of collective action based upon social capital, this paper examines whether social capital is important for successful development outcomes at the grass roots in forest protection and watershed development. Three villages of Adilabad district in Andhra Pradesh are the focus of the study.

Convergence of Programmes by Empowering SHGs and PRIs

The effectiveness of self-help groups (SHGs) would be considerably enhanced if a symbiosis could be worked out between them and panchayati raj institutions (PRIs). The key to this is the integration of SHGs with the democratically elected and empowered panchayats when the requisite devolution of powers, functions and authority to the latter takes place. A proposed scheme which will allow SHGs and PRIs to work in tandem and reinforce each other's work.
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