ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

SeditionSubscribe to Sedition

The Law of the Executive

Anushka Singh ( anushka@aud.ac.in ) is an assistant professor at the School of Law, Governance, and Citizenship at Ambedkar University, Delhi.

Sedition and the Misuse of Laws

The true state of fundamental rights in India cannot be determined by reading the judgments of the Supreme Court or the high courts that, though called “constitutional courts,” are not the “only” “constitutional courts” in India. The magistrates and civil judges, despite called the “subordinate courts,” are just as important but receive much less attention in conversations about fundamental rights.

Making Sense of the Supreme Court Order on Sedition

The recent Supreme Court order on sedition ensures some relief but is incomplete.

Towards a Political Etymology of Sedition

Criminalisation of sedition is normatively inconsistent with the value framework of democracy.

Memories of the Father of Our Movements, Father Stan Swamy

A researcher and activist remembers the time spent with Father Stan Swamy at Bagaicha, a community training centre that was started by the Jesuit priest and tribal rights activist.

Sedition in India: Colonial Legacy, Misuse and Effect on Free Speech

Since its inception, Section 124A of the Indian Penal Code, which punishes sedition, has been a tool in the hands of the state to curb criticism and dissent. It has been used by the colonial British government as well as by successive governments of independent India against political dissidents. */

The Court Fails the Citizen

The dismissal of the case on misuse of the sedition law suggests the Supreme Court is removed from reality.

Where is this Self-Proclaimed Nationalism Coming From?

Jawaharlal Nehru University Students Union President Kanhaiya Kumar gave a speech in JNU after he was released from judicial custody on being granted a six month interim bail by the Delhi High Court. We reproduce an English translation of sections of his Hindi speech.

Targeting Institutions of Higher Education

The ideology central to the Bharatiya Janata Party-Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh has no space or use for liberal thought and values. Education for such organisations means only what can be called a kind of catechism. This is a memorisation of a narrow set of questions rooted in faith and belief and an equally narrow set of answers that prohibit any doubt or deviation. Therefore, educational centres that allow questioning and discussion are anathema and have to be dismantled.

University and the Nation

If nationalist sentiments are the only and final prerogative to belong to an academic community, then it must also be reiterated, a university has no business to share these sentiments. The founding figures of JNU knew it and it is upon the entire community of students, teachers and concerned citizens to safeguard the university against such jingoistic versions of nationalism.

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