ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Right to Information: The Promise of Participatory Democracy and Accountability

In July 2019, the parliament passed an amendment to the Right to Information Act, 2005, that reduces its effectiveness. The amendment adds to the long list of erosions the Act has weathered by prior governments.

Downgrading the Status of Chief Information Commissioner

The right to information, much like the right to vote, is rooted in the same fundamental right, with the offices of the chief information commissioner and the chief election commissioner, respectively, operating at the same level of autonomy, towards the enforcement of these rights. The proposed amendments to the Right to Information Act, which reportedly seek to downgrade the status of the chief information commissioner and information commissioners, reduce the autonomy of this constitutional institution and are, consequently, an assault on the right to information and democracy.

Right to Privacy and RTI Act

Against the backdrop of Justice K S Puttaswamy (Retd) and Anr v Union of India and Ors in which the nine judges declared unanimously that the state cannot abuse its power to search, tap phones and knock the doors at midnight without any legally prescribed reasonable procedure and justification, this article argues that the state has to put machinery and authority in place to secure the right to privacy.

Goa: Perils of Knowing

The state's Right to Information Act, 1997 has given rise to a number of applications for information from a wide-ranging section of the population. Their experience, although uneven, has probably had some impact on the functioning of the government which now can, at any time, come under direct scrutiny by the people.
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