ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Reservations in IndiaSubscribe to Reservations in India

Quotas and Minority Rights: Recapturing the Constitutional Vision

The constitutional purpose of affirmative action and the preferential treatment for the deprived and the vulnerable that it implied was to address the anomalies and contradictions of our society, specifically focusing on caste, religion, and patriarchy. Caste quotas have become a quest for upward social mobility; the creamy layer of recipient communities uses them for its own partisan benefit to the exclusion of those more disadvantaged and more deserving in their own communities. Minority rights consolidate the traditional elites and religious leaders of these communities who become fundamentalist to preserve the status quo. Recapturing the constitutional vision of an inclusive and egalitarian society and a participative and integrated democracy will demand another model of development, with more fine-tuned affirmative policies and a more focused preferential treatment for the disadvantaged.

Why Jat Reservations?

Instead of the image of a prosperous and dominant community, the Jats of Uttar Pradesh have socio-economic indices comparable to Other Backward Classes like the Yadavas and Gujjars. The recent protest by Jats in Uttar Pradesh asking for OBC classification and reservations in government jobs is driven by the extended government neglect of their backwardness.

Caste in 21st Century India: Competing Narratives

Recent debates regarding inclusion of caste in 2011 Census have raised questions about whether caste still matters in modern India. Ethnographic studies of the mid-20th century identified a variety of dimensions along which caste differentiation occurs. At the same time, whether this differentiation translates into hierarchy remains a contentious issue as does the persistence of caste, given the economic changes of the past two decades. Using data from a nationally representative survey of 41,554 households conducted in 2005, this paper examines the relationship between social background and different dimensions of well-being. The results suggest continued persistence of caste disparities in education, income and social networks.

Dalit Capitalism and Pseudo Dalitism

What does one make of the tiny section of dalits propagating dalit capitalism?

Social Exclusion and Jobs Reservation in India

The root of the problem of poor dalit achievement in India lies in the many dysfunctional primary and secondary schools in the villages and towns. Affirmative action policies, which are implemented to boost a deprived group's employment rate, suffer from several defects, in particular, they have only a small effect when the group's educational base is low. Social exclusion robs people of their "confidence" and this loss adversely affects their capacity to function.

E-grantz for Dalit Students

The educational grants to the students of the dalit, adivasi, and backward communities such as stipends and fellowships form an aspect of state affirmative action. Easy access to such assistance is as important as its adequacy. The transparency in its distribution is also a matter of concern. In...

Caste in South Asia

This is with reference to “Comparative Contexts of Discrimination: Caste and Untouchability in South Asia” by Surinder S Jodhka and Ghanshyam Shah (EPW, 27 November 2010). Academic discussions about the caste system in south Asia are not a new thing but this paper, based on a large-scale survey, is...

Caste Census: The Road Ahead

Can we expect to see a greater clarity of purpose and firmness of resolve in counting caste?

Why the Census Should Not Count Caste

A response to the article "The Politics of Not Counting Caste" (EPW, 19 June 2010) and the editorial "Why We Must Count Caste" (22 May) on caste in the 2011 Census, contesting the main arguments therein on the need to enumerate all castes during the enumeration.

Caste and Census: A Forward Looking Strategy

In modern India, vast quantities of research have documented caste-based inequalities in many dimensions of well-being. If these inequalities are not simply imagined but reflect social processes that deserve public policy attention, incorporating questions about caste in the census is imperative. However, there is a need to devise an accounting framework that has clarity of purpose since there are many complexities involved in collecting caste data.

Counting Castes: Advantage the Ruling Class

If castes are counted in the 2011 census, it will be the second biggest blow to the emancipation project of the oppressed, the first being the Mandal reservations.

Caste Injustice in Jawaharlal Nehru University

Be it in the implementation of a University Grants Commission guideline on reservation for scheduled castes, scheduled tribes and other backward classes in faculty positions, or in the matter of providing justice to student victims of caste prejudice and violence, the Jawaharlal Nehru University (New Delhi) administration has shown a regressive attitude that belies its progressive image.

Pages

Back to Top