ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

RapeSubscribe to Rape

The Dead Body and Its Fragment

It is a tragedy that the remnants of a dead body defi ne who a human is.

Why Should the Marital Rape Exception be Removed?

The marital rape exception must be removed as it is no longer legally tenable in light of the Supreme Court decisions in various cases. Contrary to arguments that the central government has advanced repeatedly, these decisions hold that marriage does not mean there is irrevocable consent for sexual intercourse, and that a regressive practice cannot be used to ensure the stability of marriage.

A Crisis of Identity

Current media reportage of sexual assault cases in India not only violates journalistic norms but also gravely impacts the victim’s right to privacy. Against the backdrop of the Kathua gang rape and the #MeToo movement, this paper argues that the law surrounding the identification of sexual assault victims must be amended to help better secure justice for victims, while also ensuring that their dignity is safeguarded. Adult victims ought to be granted statutory agency to speak out regarding instances of sexual violence they have faced although separate guidelines are required for the reporting of child sexual assault. Additionally, the ethical guidelines governing media reportage of sexual violence must be revisited. With respect to #MeToo, while media houses should report accusations, they are also required to ensure that pronouncements of guilt are not being made

Aziz Ansari, Mohammad Farooqui and the Dangerous Myth of a ‘Right' Way To Resist

Despite new robust legislation in place to protect women's rights, courts of law, in rape trials, still tend to lay emphasis on what the man presumed rather than what the woman communicated, and are over-willing to accept the man’s presumptions, however unreasonable they may be.

10 Years of Khairlanji

Was justice really done in the Khairlanji massacre? Is there any let-up in atrocities against Dalits? More importantly, will the victims get justice given the depressing trend in recent judgments, where perpetrators of violence against Dalits have been repeatedly acquitted?

Muslim Women’s Rights and Media Coverage

Despite the large number of positive court judgements in favour of Muslim women in India, the media prefers to endorse the view that once the husband pronounces talaq, the wife is stripped of all her rights. Similarly, articles by experts, while focusing on the need to declare instantaneous triple talaq invalid, pay little attention to the rights laboriously secured from the trial courts, the high courts and even the Supreme Court by many Muslim women.

Voices from Kamduni

The sessions court verdict in the Kamduni gang rape case has been welcomed by the villagers and activists who have been protesting both the atrocity as well as the complicity of the state government in the act.

Sexual Violence and Impunity in Bastar

The state is in a renewed drive to "clean" Chhattisgarh of Naxalites. The large-scale combing operations have meant pillaging and looting of settlements, and mass sexual violence perpetrated on inhabitants of Peddagalur, Kunna and Nendra, among others, over the last six months. Victims and human rights groups are fighting an uphill battle to ensure that security forces and vigilante groups be held accountable for their crimes, and another reign of terror with impunity, like Salwa Judum, be stopped in its tracks.

Women: Rape and the Law

The incident took plate in a village police station in Nagpur district more than eight years ago. By the time the story begins, Mathura, then aged between 14 and 16, had developed a 'relationship' with Ashok, the cousin of Nushi at whose house she used to work, and had begun to live with him. On March 26, 1978, Gatna, Mathura's brother, lodged a report that Mathura, his sister, had been 'kidnapped' by Nushi, her husband, and Ashok. They were all brought to the police station at about 9 pm when their statements were recorded. When everyone started leaving the police station around 10.30 pm, Tukaram, the head constable and Ganpat a constable directed that Mathura remain at the police station. What happened thereafter is that she was first raped by Ganpat and, after him, by Tukaram, who however only molested her because he was too drunk to forcibly have sexual intercourse with Mathura.
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