ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

PunjabSubscribe to Punjab

Gender Differentials in Famine Mortality

For most of south Asia gender differentials in instances of famine mortality have generally shown a pattern of relative female survival advantage during crisis. Yet variations in its occurrence and its antecedents have not been inquired into very systematically. This paper attempts to look at gender differentials during two 19th century famines - the Madras famine of 1876-78 and the Punjab famine of 1896-97 - from a public health perspective. It is an attempt to explore links between gender discrimination, status and labour force participation during the colonial period.

Punjab Assembly Elections

In the Punjab assembly elections this year the polarisation of voters between the Congress and the Akali Dal was so sharp that other parties and groups, including the allies of the two, were reduced to the position of spoilers at best.

Caste and Untouchability in Rural Punjab

Despite having the largest proportion of scheduled caste population in India, Punjab has rarely been seen as a relevant case for conceptualisation of the caste system and the changes taking place therein. Though some aspects of caste in Punjab have been studied, there has virtually been no detailed empirical documentation of the practice of untouchability in rural Punjab. Based on an extensive field-study, this paper provides a broad mapping of the prevailing caste relations and the practice of untouchability in rural Punjab. The study focuses specifically on the process of change, particularly in the context of agrarian transformations that the Punjab countryside has experienced in the wake of the success of green revolution technology. The paper also argues that the processes of change could be meaningfully captured through the categories of 'dissociation', 'distancing' and 'autonomy'.

Punjab : Assembly Elections-Decline of Identity Politics

With a new generation that has grown up in the post-militancy period, Gurdwara politics has little appeal and voters have tended to vote for a party that is expected to be most likely to maintain peace in the state, the Congress. While the BJP's traditional vote bank of upper caste Hindus has been eroded to the advantage of the Congress, the SAD has lost some of its support among the non-jat, especially OBC, Sikhs.

Green Revolution: In Light and Shade

Green Revolutions Reconsidered – The Rural World of Contemporary Punjab by Himmat Singh; Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2001; pp 302, Rs 595.

Punjab : Covering Up Non-Performance

Anti-incumbency has been an important in elections in Punjab, especially in the last decade. This was last evident in the 1999 Lok Sabha elections which were swept by the Congress. Yet chief minister and leader of the ruling AD-BJP coalition, Prakash Singh Badal, seems to have learnt little from experience and seems set on the same electoral gambles that had cost his party dear in the 1999 elections.

Punjab Terrorism: Truth Still Uncovered

Terrorism in Punjab: Understanding Grassroots Reality by Harish K Puri, Paramjit Singh Judge, Jagrup Singh Sekhon; Har-Anand Publications , New Delhi, 1999; pp 200, Rs 395.

Minority Status for Sikhs in Punjab

As Punjab enters another election year, the Akali Dal seems to be shifting to the community/religion axis of its politics in the hope of consolidating its electoral base. The state government's recent decision to classify three professional colleges run by the SGPC as 'minority institutions' is apparently a part of this effort.

Fod For The Poor : Rs 30 Per Kg

I n the view of the prime minister’s economic advisory council, according to the note on ‘Economic Reforms: A Medium Term Perspective’ prepared for the council’s meeting this week, “the present [foodgrain] procurement policy should be drastically revised so as to limit government purchases only for preventing sharp fall in prices (i e to support prices) instead of government buying all that is offered at predetermined ‘fair’ prices”. Less than a fortnight before the council’s meeting, the chief ministers of Punjab and Haryana had rushed to Delhi to meet the prime minister and seek an assurance from him that there would be no cut in the price at which the Food Corporation of India (FCI) would buy wheat in the forthcoming rabi marketing season. On his return from the capital, the Punjab chief minister told newspersons in Chandigarh that he and his Haryana counterpart had indeed got the assurance they had sought from the prime minister.

Arya Samaj and Punjab Politics

Arya Samaj continues to profoundly influence Punjab politics. To understand Punjab politics, the role of the local Arya centres is particularly important. The local Arya centres bring together people who not only share their belief in the doctrine of Arya Samaj but are also in agreement over certain political issues and in their commitment to political parties.

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