ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Political SocietySubscribe to Political Society

Political Stability in West Bengal

The conventional belief indicates that the gradual success of an incumbent party lies in the economic progression of the state and the well-being of the majority of voters. However, the recent growth of the incumbent party in West Bengal does not support the belief entirely. A marginal improvement of agriculture and rural people, relying on the delivery of welfare schemes at the cost of overall growth (including industrial and service sectors), reveals a redistribute strategy employed by the state in the federal setting. This compels the dependency of low-income people on minuscule resources in the absence of modern sector growth along with building an organisation of cadres, mushroomed under the shadow of welfare schemes, to deliver those services among the networks against the agency fees and commission, worked effectively to engineer the popularity and helped to extinguish the unrest among the non-beneficiaries. This paper unfolds evidence in support of such a strategy that helped maintain incumbency.

Land Acquisition

Empirical work by researchers increasingly finds that farmers are willing to sell their land if the price-compensation package is "acceptable." This article takes an introductory review of different frameworks like accumulation by dispossession, political society/civil society, reversal of the effects of primitive accumulation; and double movement in the context of land acquisition. With farmers wanting to move out of agriculture in a big way and looking for alternatives, there is a need to accept the farmers' willingness to be partners in the developmental processes. At the same time, largely due to the protest movements and the concomitant violence, the state is becoming more accommodating of the demands for better compensation. In such a situation, a covenant between the state and land needs to emerge.

Society vs State?

Examination of the contemporary discourse about civil society, the non-party political process and political society in India and the political agendas which they support, with regard to their importance for identifying and articulating important political problems of our society.

'Civic Community' and Its Margins

Analysing India's democracy demands a move beyond a study of social capital in the civic community. It calls for a focus on how the civic community seeks to 'assimilate' the political society in response to the historical separation between the two and how political society in turn tries to make use of institutions of civic community to serve its distinctly different interests. This study ventures to examine the margins of India's civic community in West Bengal - village school teachers in Purulia and Bardhaman - in relation to the classes and segments of rural society.
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