ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Serving Quarantine

(After Serving Time by Charles Simic)

Night of the Murdered Poets

Microaggression and Poetry in a Local Train In these poems set in and about trains, the Indian Railways shows potential as a site of modernity, but instead becomes the site of microaggression and violence.

Poet in the Political Activist

Captive Imagination: Letters from Prison by Varavara Rao (New Delhi: Penguin-Viking), 2010; pp 193, Rs 350 (hardcover).

Calcutta Diary

It is not that Subhas Mukhopadhyay did not receive enough of prizes and rewards when he was a card-carrying communist. He was a household name in Bengali left households, generations have been reared, and inspired, by his poetry and prose. But once bitten by the bug of disillusion, he got hopelessly disequilibrated. He migrated from faith into cynicism. He chose, particularly during the closing years, coarse company. It was a coarse funeral he received. It is a cruel thing to say, but he dug his own grave. It is a tragedy, but there it is.

Odyssey of a Poem

The odyssey of a poem published in a Marathi little magazine almost 20 years ago has landed us in a moment of guilty introspection.

Sarojini Naidu: Romanticism and Resistance

Born in Hyderabad, India in 1879 Sarojini Naidu received a British education. Her poems pick up the diction of the English decadents, transposing the images into India. The pained passive women in her poetry stand however in radical contrast to Naidu's own life: she was a close friend of Gandhi's and active in the National movement, suffering imprisonment numerous times. In 1925 she was elected the first Indian women president of the National Congress. How can the cleft between her poetry and her politics be explained? What does it reveal about the complex procedures of Naidu's own evolving feminism as it struggled with colonialism?
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