ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

PeaceSubscribe to Peace

Memories and Memorials of the Mizo National Front Movement

The narrative of peace in Mizoram has become a part of national memory, but it is also embedded in larger politics of erasing a violent past. This is, in part, associated with the state agenda of presenting a “successful” case of conflict management, along with its refusal to acknowledge its violent actions. Tension over the issue of memorialisation continues to resurface at the local level, across political spectrums and local organisations—a consequence of the purported exclusion of violent memories in the official narratives and the neglect of “other” voices within the narrative of the movement. In this regard, the construction and contestation of the narrative of “peace” in Mizoram and the politics associated with its commemoration, merit further examination.

Thinking Kashmir

Waiting is so much a part of everydayness, including waiting for peace, waiting for your loved ones to come home, waiting for curfew to end, waiting for the army to go home. Between silence and waiting one can create a narrative of the Kashmir conflict. Unlike the Holocaust or partition, which have the gigantism of epic memories, the sadness of Kashmir is forged, crafted out of thousands of little memories, unwritten diaries merging quietly together. It is this alchemy of memories that is struggling against government policy, which sanitises violence and erases memory to create this strange machine that moves from violence to violence in facile amnesia.

Iraq, UN and Changing Bases of World Order

'Regime change' lies at the intersection of two major trends under UN auspices. The first is the progressive universalisation of the human rights norm carried out through a large number of legal conventions and promoted, however imperfectly, through a substantial legal machinery. The second is the central and irreplaceable role of the Security Council as the core of the international law enforcement system. Except in cases of selfdefence, only the Security Council can decide whether or not it is lawful to go to war. The US victory in Iraq has come at the price of re-legitimising wars of choice as an instrument of unilateral state policy and will usher in more determined efforts by many countries to acquire weapons of mass destruction, since nothing else is capable of deterring external attack.

Brutal Wars and a Malevolent Peace

The cost of a botched peace in Iraq would be even higher than the price of a bloody war. The world community has to decide how best it can hold the US accountable for its crimes in Iraq. The alternative - acquiescence in the hit and run strategy that the US has raised to a fine art in the last few decades - would be an unaffordable luxury in the current state of international relations.

Peace in South Asia

The carving out of a communally defined state in 1949 from a formally secular India with a dominant Hindu leadership and the proposal to partition another such state in Sri Lanka whose secular democratic status has already been undermined by Sinhala Buddhist nationalism presents strikingly similar situations. Given these irreconcilable nationalisms what are the prospects for peace in the subcontinent?

Peace in South Asia

For better India-Pakistan relations, of which Kashmir is undoubtedly a critical component, and peace in South Asia, good intentions are no substitute for intimate knowledge of the ground realities. The case of Stephen Cohen's 'Moving Forward in South Asia'.

India-Pakistan: Cultural Contexts

A dialogue is only possible if the historical and cultural variety in the two geographically diverse entities are taken into account.
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