ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Osama Bin LadenSubscribe to Osama Bin Laden

Demise of Islamism?

Unholy War: Terror in the Name of Islam by John L Esposito; Oxford University Press, 2002; pp 196, Rs 295. Jihad: The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia by Ahmed Rashid; Orient Longman, 2002; pp 281, Rs 295

Timothy McVeighs of the 'Orient'

Timothy McVeigh and Osama bin Laden share cammon ground. The difference, if any, is that the terrorism of the former arises out of moral guilt whereas that of the latter stems from entrenched anger and a profound sense of being a helpless victim, real or otherwise.

Zeroing in on Ground Zero

The terror attacks of September 11 left behind a shaky and suddenly insecure America, living in the constant fear of still more terror attacks. In New York, six months later, the scars still remain, eloquently symbolised by the gaping emptiness and rubble where the Twin Towers once stood, but there are also all too visible signs of recovery, of a coping born out of a city's shared sorrow.

Us and Them in the New World Order

The world did not radically change on September 11. The reasons for that act of terror lie in the shift in the geopolitical balance of power in the past quarter of a century. The contrasts that already existed are hardening into segments of inclusion and exclusion.

Beyond Afghanistan

The bomb and missile attacks by US and British aircraft on targets in Afghanistan connected with the Taliban regime and with Osama bin Laden and his Al Qaeda organisation, which got under way on Sunday, had been prepared for elaborately from the moment the US pinpointed bin Laden and Al Qaeda as the prime suspects in connection with the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington. As the world watched with bated breath, the US and Britain had set about putting together the most awesome assembly of military personnel and materiel all around Afghanistan for precisely this operation. A relentless diplomatic effort too had been mounted to get an impressive number of countries to permit combat aircraft to use their air-space and some also to agree to the stationing of troops on their territories. The air attacks on Afghanistan have been on for less than a week and there is no indication yet of when the expected, but far more problematic, land operations would begin. But already it is clear that, even if the US government’s most optimistic expectations of it are fulfilled, the military effort directed at Afghanistan cannot be the all-important, or the most effective, element in the success of the drive against terrorism that it has been made out to be by the Bush administration.

Future of a Fatal Symbiosis

Caught between a forgetful people encouraging their rulers to go berserk in their homicidal revengefulness, and a starving people imprisoned in a cage of religious memories created by fanatical zealots who are bent on an equally vengeful suicidal retaliation, the world in the new millennium seems to be readying itself for another catastrophe.
Back to Top