ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Neo-liberal Restoration at the Barrel of a Gun

Some characteristics of the contemporary phase of global neo-liberalism in light of the recent coup organised by the extreme right-wing forces in Bolivia against the leftist President Evo Morales in 2019 are examined. Despite having minuscule popular support, the backing of the armed forces and United States imperialism emboldened the post-coup government to aggressively restore neo-liberal policies in an unabashedly dictatorial fashion. The coup in Bolivia becomes a paradigmatic case that highlights how neo-liberalism as a political–economic doctrine continues to articulate with racism and religious fundamentalism to establish and maintain its dominance.

A Socialist Cry for Civilisational Change: COVID-19 and the Failure of Neo-liberalism

A destroyed society has been confronted by a cruel virus. The coronavirus pandemic has laid bare the failure of the capitalist and neo-liberal regime in controlling the virus. In these times, people have shown their support for a democratic socialist state that places the health of its populace at its centre. Now, the politicians need to listen.

Cities and Class Inequality in Neo-liberal Times: An Insight from Parasite

In current neo-liberal times, cities have become spaces of exclusion, where widening class inequalities are manifested. By reviewing the movie Parasite, the article attempts to present a narrative of the present Korean urban reality and how it resembles the situation in most cities across the global South.

Dancing between Charisma and Politics: An Analysis of Joker (2019)

Joker (2019) is set against an exterior world mirroring the New York City of the 1980s, with its crumbling economy and neo-liberal policies, woven together with the interior world of the rapidly deteriorating mind of its protagonist Arthur Fleck, who has a mental health condition. The article analyses the mild-mannered Fleck’s transition into the slick and charismatic Joker by tracing acts of violence inflicted on him and those that he commits violence upon. Interrogating violent scenes in the film reveals how Joker glorifies and legitimises specific forms of violence, situating the story in a backdrop devoid of historical and political rootedness.

Neo-liberalism, Development and Deprivation in India

Dispossession, Deprivation and Development: Essays for Utsa Patnaik edited by Arindam Banerjee and C P Chandrasekhar, New Delhi: Tulika Books, 2018; pp x +270, ₹ 750.

National Policy on Education 2016

Any contemporary education policy will need to address the democratic and economic aspirations of the younger citizenry and must declare those concrete steps that would endure the realisation of those aims. But that has not been the case with the National Policy on Education 2016. The new education policy, as proposed, chooses not to address the fundamental issues plaguing the education system but instead, it propagates a corporate, neo-liberal, neo-cultural, a Sanskritised, global and market-oriented education system which is governed by a wholly separate and centralised bureaucracy, where state government power and oversight is minimal.

IMF's Autocritique of Neo-liberalism?

In a recent article published in Finance and Development, an International Monetary Fund magazine, three economists have critically evaluated the policies the IMF promotes. They acknowledge evidence that suggests that economic growth under neo-liberalism is difficult to sustain, that it leads to an increase in inequality, and that continuing inequality is harmful for sustainable (or continuing) growth.

Enabling Participatory Democracy

Democracy Deepening Democracy edited by Archon Fung and Erik Olin Wright; Verso Publications, London, 2003; paperback, pp 310, $ 22.

Governance and the Pluralisation of the State

The state has been pluralised and now shares power with sub-national governments, proliferating forms of network and partnership organisations, a variety of quasi-public and private organisations, NGOs and international agencies and other forms of supranational governance. What remains of the significance or meaning of the liberal democratic notion of the state as the undisputed centre of political aspirations and its task of pursuing the collective interest when it has been itself enmeshed in a number of organisations? How do we democratise bodies that are out of the reach of representation? How do we ensure that democratic procedures take into account background inequalities? Governance in other words has thrown up major challenges for the liberal democratic project and we need to think this through. Or should we raise new questions for the project of governance itself?

Australia in India

If the 1990s marked an intensification of the process of `globalisation', within the policy discourse of the higher education sector that process has manifested itself through the idea of the `international university'. In part, internationalisation implies a redefinition of higher education as a globally marketed commodity or as an export oriented `industry'. These developments are examined by means of an analysis of the internationalisation of Australian education, and the operational procedures, strategies, and expansionist market objectives of Australian higher education institutions in India. It is argued that, under the hegemony of neo-liberal ideology, these international linkages are emerging as a result of the transformation and restructuring of the higher education sector in both nations.

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