ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

MoralitySubscribe to Morality

Gandhi as an Exemplar?

Akeel Bilgrami’s theorisation of M K Gandhi as an exemplar who, by his actions, sets “examples” for others explains the exemplar morality of Gandhi as non-violent, as no moral criticism is generated when examples are not set, and contrasts it with the morality based on universalisable principles, which causes contempt, hostility, and violence when the principles fail to universalise. This paper questions the exemplar thesis and shows that it does not explain how satyagraha as a political strategy could be both exemplary and political, that the conception of non-violence which inheres the thesis is deficient, and that the assumption that universalisable principles coerce others is not true insofar as Kant’s categorical imperative is made to represent the principle-based morality. It also argues that reading Gandhi as an exemplar is inconsistent with his view of swaraj.

 

New Global Order, Ethics, Niti, and Three Indian Texts

Virtue and Human Ends: Political Ideas from Indian Classics by Vasanthi Srinivasan, Orient BlackSwan, 2021; pp 216, `685.

Historicising the Animal–Human Relationship

Meat, Mercy, and Morality: Animals and Humanitarianism in Colonial Bengal, 1850–1920 by Samiparna Samanta, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2021; pp 288, $75.

The Public Sphere Rediscovered

This article aims to re-evaluate the infl uence the Greeks and especially Aristotle have had on Jürgen Habermas’s thought via Hannah Arendt. The purpose of such a reassessment is to argue that Habermas’s reconstruction of the public sphere is conceptually yet indirectly embedded in the Aristotelian historical and intellectual trajectory, which is often neglected.

Remembering Wajida Tabassum’s Radical Short Fiction

Wajida Tabassum’s stories—relatively unknown now, but popular and controversial in her time—explore gender and class through sexuality, desire, and resistance.

 

Kissing in Protest

Over the last few days a lot has been done, said and written on the “Kiss of Love” protests, but perhaps we have forgotten that the primary intention of the protests is not to kiss in public, but to claim one’s right to the freedom of expression.

Mutilated Liberty and the Constitution

Without liberty there cannot be democracy and Article 19 of the Indian Constitution guarantees that right to all citizens. In order that the state can regulate the individual's freedom in the greater interest of society a number of restrictions have been placed on these rights. However the restrictions have become so numerous today that the balance has tilted towards social control rather than liberty.

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