ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

ManagementSubscribe to Management

NEP 2020 and the Discontinuation of the MPhil Degree

The National Education Policy 2020 provides a framework for reorganising and revamping higher education in India. Among several of its recommendations, the decision to discontinue the MPhil programme is a signifi cant one. The article makes an attempt to understand the perspective behind the move to discontinue the MPhil programme. The MPhil programme is discontinued for the more research-oriented undergraduate and master’s degrees. In a way, the discontinuation of MPhil is the collateral damage caused by the new structure of degrees that the NEP has proposed.

The NEP 2020 and Future of Masters Programmes in Management Education

Management education in India is offered as a degree by universities and as a postgraduate diploma by the All India Council for Technical Education approved stand-alone institutions. The present work focuses on the challenges of the pedagogy and curriculum adopted by the management institutions offering postgraduate-level programmes. The palpability of localised curriculum with pedagogical innovations cited in the National Education Policy 2020 are critically discussed here. The higher education institutions offering degree or postgraduate diploma in management programmes are segmented into three tiers. The daunting questions and scaling of the mid-tier institutions are the focus of this critical review.

Adherence to Pandemic Ethics during India’s Covid-19 Lockdown

Adherence to pandemic ethics complements, regulates and refines public health emergency law enforcements. It is integral that ethics should not only be limited to the content of the policies but also to the processes. The two Indian laws used to fight the Covid-19 pandemic are either antiquated or inappropriately applied. In this context, the article analyses the adherence of countrywide lockdown to the existing principles of ethics.

Managing Radio Frequency Spectrum

Radio spectrum is a limited resource and by tradition has come to be owned by the state. Its use has to be regulated in terms of purpose of use, place, transmitted power and coverage including directivity. In India the sharp demand for allotment of radio spectrum arose in the 1990s with the introduction of cellular mobile radio. The government and its agencies have not been particularly able or wise in coping with the diverse demands since then.
Back to Top