ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

LiberalisationSubscribe to Liberalisation

Leveraging Liberalisation

Using the Indian cement industry as an example, this paper argues that there is a limit to leveraging liberalisation. Developing-country companies cannot match the clout of MNCs in controlling the global market. The Indian cement industry, which witnessed rapid production and capacity growth during the past two decades, has suffered a decline in exports in recent years as MNCs setting up shop in other developing countries retained their hold on international markets.

International Financial Liberalisation

Theory offers a number of plausible benefits from international financial liberalisation. However, a careful examination of available empirical literature on the subject suggests much less reason to be sanguine about the benefits. In view of the widelynoted concerns regarding short-term indebtedness, a strong case can be made for the setting of prudential limits on the amount of short-term debt that a country can accumulate. Somewhat less clear is what steps need to be taken to reduce vulnerability due to uncovered long-term foreign currency borrowing.

Small-Scale Units in the Era of Globalisation

This paper focuses on the ongoing changes in the business environment and the analysis of their implications for small-scale units. Specifically, it looks at possible ways of improving the competitive strength and commercial viability of small-scale units in the changing context. For this, substantial improvements will be needed in technology, such as mechanisation, organisation and information and the revamping of policy measures to encourage the growth of small units through collective efforts, ending their isolated mode of operation.

Indian Ocean Regionalism: Is There a Future?

The Indian Ocean Rim Association for Regional Cooperation was launched to affect a quicker process of liberalisation in countries disadvantaged in one way or other in the WTO regime, so that through open regional arrangements and agreements they could all gain quickly from the transforming trade and investment environment. An assessment of its five-year existence.

A New Development Paradigm

At the beginning of the 21st century there is the need for a new development paradigm that recognises that 'government failure' is a much more important problem than 'market failure'. 'Privatisation' of government services by its employees and government's monopoly of power are the real problems today. The new paradigm must be based on a clear and non-ideological recognition of the strengths and the weakness of the state and the people. A democratic society has enormous potential for entrepreneurship, innovation and creative development. The people, their diverse forms of activity and association such as companies, cooperatives, societies, trusts and other NGOs must be allowed and encouraged to play their due role. The state must focus on what only it can do best and shed all activities that the people can do as well or better. The heavy hand of government in the form of incentive-distorting laws, rules, regulations, procedures and red tape have also corrupted industry and business and other organised interest groups. These must be removed so as to release the energy of the people. The state should confine itself to managing the economy so as to accelerate employment and income growth in a self-sustaining manner, ensure that all citizens receive their basic entitlements of basic public goods and services and empower the poor so that they have equal rights (and responsibilities) with the better off citizens.

Liberalisation and the Woman Worker

Liberalisation and its after-effects has been a subject of great debate. While proponents point to the declining levels of poverty, opponents insist the opposite has happened - poverty has increased, employment opportunities and access to social services have declined. This article looks at the micro sector - the world of the unorganised woman worker and analyses the varied impact that liberalisation and globalisation has had on her working conditions. A decline in employment opportunities has seen a simultaneous 'casualisation' and growing 'feminisation' of the workforce - with concomitant ills of low wages and declining job security.

Shrimp Culture in Chilika Lake

The fish economy of the Chilika Lake underwent a series of dramatic changes from the early 1990s. Liberalisation that boosted exports and modernised techniques has also seen shifts in the Chilika lease policy and the entry for the first time, of non-fishermen into the shrimp culture industry.

Reform Fatigue

The unfinished agenda of economic reforms is truly large, overwhelming and in a sense daunting, but effort must be made to move forward at least in a few critical areas. The Budget for 2002-03 fails to deliver on this score.

New Populism and Liberalisation

Political compulsions faced by a government in times of liberalisation often have an impact on economic reforms. This paper examines Chandrababu Naidu's regime in Andhra Pradesh and the task it has cut out for itself in carrying forward the liberalisation agenda while tackling popular compulsions. It also examines the character of the regime shift in seeking to incorporate different societal sections into its fold by carving out new political and social constituencies for its liberalisation reforms.

Pharmaceutical Policy, 2001

In attempting to ensure that the pharmaceutical industry is able to function profitably, and perhaps, efficiently, policy-makers have completely ignored the health concerns that are integrally linked to the contours of the drug policy.

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