ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Land reformsSubscribe to Land reforms

Lakshadweep and the Land Question: Historicising the Present Crisis

Tracing the history of land reforms in the island group shows how the previous administrations had addressed the question of bringing change into the islands. Two important features in relation to land in Lakshadweep are tenancy and matrilineal property. It is important to take a look at the ways in which previous administrations dealt with these sensitive issues.

Dynamics of Caste and Landlessness

The effects of land acquisition processes and poor urban planning on Dalits and the marginalised landless population are analysed. How minor changes in laws and policymaking processes can change or prevent future policy issues by addressing landlessness-borne issues in consistency with sustainable development goals and social inclusion is examined. This study aims to understand the complexities and transitory socio-economic problems underlying urban development planning. It finds that poor and marginal landless village residents, who had little to no idea about the land acquired for a public purpose, undoubtedly faced the most unfavourable outcomes in the course of rural to urban development.

Adivasis and Land

This paper is part of a research project, “Development in Post-colonial India: Practices and Experiences of a ‘Tribal’ Region,” sponsored by the Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR), Delhi. A previous version of this paper was presented at the “Anthropological Histories and Tribal Worlds in India” conference (27–29 March 2017) at the Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla.

Understanding What Has Gone Wrong in Pakistan

Rentier Capitalism: Disorganised Development and Social Injustice in Pakistan by Shahid Ahmed, UK: Palgrave Macmillan UK, March 2016; pp 248, $120(hardcover).

Political Intolerance in Bengal

Political intolerance is a bigger problem than religious intolerance in West Bengal. How will this affect the 2016 Assembly elections in West Bengal?

Myanmar: Conflicts over Land in a Time of Transition

Secure and just land tenure, and sound management of land and natural resources are crucial to easing conflicts between farmers, the State, and extractive industries. This paper underlines that Myanmar cannot hope to achieve inclusive social and economic development without a just and comprehensive framework that protects the land rights of small farmers, ethnic minorities, and the poor. A lack of participation and transparency in land management, coupled with legal and institutional weaknesses that work in favour of big capital rather than small farmers and the rural poor, poses a major challenge to the country's social and economic reform programme.

Unfinished Tasks

Beneficiaries of Land Reforms: The West Bengal Scenario by Anil K Chakraborti in association with Apurba Kumar Mukhopadhyay and Debesh Roy; State Institute of Panchayats and Rural Development, Kalyani, Nadia, Government of West Bengal, Spandan, Kolkata, 2003; pp 154, Rs 150.

Larger Homestead Plots as Land Reform?

Land reform legislation in India, designed to redress issues of poverty and landlessness, has in most cases, suffered from design flaws and a failure of implementation. Land reform efforts are also stymied due to a lack of political will, scarcity of land and resources. Research summarised in this article seeks to offer an innovative and alternative solution, one that involves the provision of amply-sized homestead plots. As experiments in other countries, replicated in certain districts of Karnataka have borne out, such homestead and garden plots hold out the prospect of substantial benefits to poor, rural households, offering them much more than a place to build a house.

Breaking the Deadlock: Land Reform Revisited

The regions with continuing peasant insurgencies led by various shades of Maoists are those with continuing land reform questions - Andhra Pradesh and Bihar in India, Nepal, the Philippines, for instance. While there may not be an overall coalition in favour of compulsory land redistribution, particularly given the continuing, though diminishing, role of rural landlords as controlling vote banks in an election system, there is nonetheless a substantial opinion that something needs to be done about the inequities of existing landownership in these regions. Is it possible to work out a land reform programme in this political climate? This note looks at some of the issues involved and suggests a possible way to break the deadlock.

Women Second in the Land Agenda

This study on two districts of West Bengal focuses on the status of rural women, and their equal right to productive resources, especially land, keeping in view the fact that the implementation and scale of land reform in the state has surpassed that of any other in India. Given the overwhelming desire of the women to be considered as individuals above all other classifications, and for direct ownership of property, to be able to emerge from the shadows of dependence, much needs to be done in the legislative, executive and legal spheres to address the issues pertaining to women's rights.

Maharashtra : Land Reforms: Turning the Clock Back

As part of the implementation of the Private Forests (Acquisition) Act, the state government has been acquiring land distributed to tenants and the landless, threatening to evict large numbers of tribal cultivators, all in the name of environmental protection. The livelihood resources of the poor are increasingly being diverted into capital for the private sector.

Political Economy of 'Middleness'

Behind the tumultuous developments of the recent past in West Bengal, this paper seeks to identify the more durable factors; beneath the violence, the more 'objective' causes operating silently but decisively. These 'objective' factors, it is argued, are the changing agrarian structure of rural West Bengal and, with it, the changing correlation of class forces.

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