ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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A Crisis of Identity

Current media reportage of sexual assault cases in India not only violates journalistic norms but also gravely impacts the victim’s right to privacy. Against the backdrop of the Kathua gang rape and the #MeToo movement, this paper argues that the law surrounding the identification of sexual assault victims must be amended to help better secure justice for victims, while also ensuring that their dignity is safeguarded. Adult victims ought to be granted statutory agency to speak out regarding instances of sexual violence they have faced although separate guidelines are required for the reporting of child sexual assault. Additionally, the ethical guidelines governing media reportage of sexual violence must be revisited. With respect to #MeToo, while media houses should report accusations, they are also required to ensure that pronouncements of guilt are not being made

News Hunters or Ad Gatherers?

Despite their indispensable contributions to print media, the small-town/rural stringers remain as invisible workers and their day-to-day struggles for livelihood go largely unnoticed. This article provides a field-based account on the insecure world of work of stringers, which is characterised by precarious employment with deplorable working conditions. This situation calls for urgent interventions from all stakeholders to promote decent work and fair labour standards for rural stringers.

Problematic of Practice as Pedagogy

This article offers a critical response to the writings of Indian editors and journalists by interrogating the pedagogical underpinnings of their essays on journalism. Focusing on the Caravan magazine’s “Media” section, which has been increasingly gaining traction as a critical space for discussion, the article is a humble addition to the growing conversation on the subject of the problematic of practice as pedagogy. In doing so, we push for a critique of journalism at the level of principles, values, and the holy, oft-repeated creed of professionalism.

Upper-caste Domination in India’s Mainstream Media and Its Extension in Digital Media

Empirical data from the last two-and-a-half decades tells stories of upper-caste hegemony and lack of lower-caste representation in Indian media. After the advent of digital media, and especially after the proliferation of social media and content-sharing platforms, Dalit–Bahujan professionals and many amateur journalists started their own websites and video channels, and Dalit–Bahujan intellectuals have their footprints on social media platforms like YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. The rising phenomenon of Dalit–Bahujan media in the digital space and their success or failure in democratising Indian media is examined.

Trump’s Policies and Billionaire Indian Dreams

Passage from India to America: Billionaire Engineers, Extremist Politics & Advantage to Canada & China by Ignatius Chithelen, Bryant Park Publishers LLC, New York, 2018; pp 212, $40.95 (hardcover).

Journalistic Discourse(s) and the Adivasi

When it comes to the portrayal and depiction of Adivasi communities, the media and journalistic discourse has been reluctant to move away from archaic constructs and ideas. Understanding Adivasi life from their perspective and advocating for “development” on their behalf must be through their terms, cooperating with their traditional systems of existence.
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