ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Jammu and KashmirSubscribe to Jammu and Kashmir

Reorganisation of J&K and Anxiety in Jammu

The response of the people of the Jammu region to the abrupt changes made in Jammu and Kashmir, both related to revocation of the special constitutional status of the state and its reorganisation, is explored. Historically tracing the response of the region towards Article 370 and locating it in its relationship with Kashmir, the anxieties being felt in the region after the changes in August 2019 are discussed.

Land Laws of Jammu and Kashmir

The new land laws implemented by the union government in Jammu and Kashmir are cataclysmic, as they seek to upend a legal structure that emerged out of one of the most successful land reforms in South Asia. The earlier land order is considered one of the main reasons for the lower levels of poverty in the region and sustaining a distinct political, economic and cultural milieu within J&K. These new laws therefore do not merely affect land transactions but can potentially alter the basic societal structure of J&K.

Food Security and the Public Distribution System in Jammu and Kashmir

Till 1990–91, Jammu and Kashmir used to be a food surplus state, but it turned into a food-deficit state by 2000, due to changing land use pattern, stagnant agricultural production, unfavourable climate, conflict, and misplaced policy priorities. J&K faces issues with availability and accessibility more than with affordability. This study suggests systematic reforms to curb the leakages within the system in order to provide food security to the people at large. *** Corrigendum In our article “Food Security and the Public Distribution System in Jammu and Kashmir,” published in the 26 December 2020 issue of EPW, we inadvertently missed citing Dar (2015) for Table 1 and para 7 on page 19. Therefore, we add the following citation in our article through this corrigendum: Dar, Tanveer Ahmad (2015): “Food Security in Kashmir: Food Production and the Universal Public Distribution System,” Social Change, Vol 45, No 3, pp 400–20. The inconvenience is deeply regretted. —Shaveta Kohli, Khurshid Ahmad Rather The error is regretted. — Ed.

On People’s Alliance for Gupkar Declaration

The new alliance is reconfigured around the prospect of democratic politics, but its realisation may face challenges.

Jammu and Kashmir’s Open Defecation Free Status

The erstwhile state of Jammu and Kashmir, now the union territory of J&K, attained 100% open defecation free status in September 2018, well before the Swachh Bharat Mission (Grameen) deadline of 2 October 2019. However, the movement of women in flocks to fields as it gets dark portrays quite a different picture. Do the so-called individual household latrines exist only on paper, while being incomplete and non-functional in reality? Are these not being used due to cultural barriers and socialisation? What policy steps are needed to effect change in rural sanitation behaviour? To answer these questions and suggest a way forward, a micro-study was carried out in Bishnah block of Jammu district.

The Domicile Law of Jammu and Kashmir

The domicile law introduced in the newly created union territory of Jammu and Kashmir has aggravated the already deteriorating situation. The policy is a result of a historical, political and policy myopia of the current dispensation, which has failed to understand the significance of the earlier permanent residency laws for different communities across the erstwhile state of J&K. It has evoked fear of demographic change, loss of economic and cultural rights and has engineered profound changes in the political structure of the region.

Kashmir after Article 370

The abrogation of Article 370, after a year, continues to elude democratic experience and aspirations.

Kashmir Media Policy: Accentuating the Curbs on the Freedom of Press

Journalists reporting from Kashmir have always worked under immense pressure, facing intimidation, assaults, and arrests. The latest media policy, announced by the Kashmir administration in May 2020, is a continuation of measures taken to curtail the free flow of information in Kashmir after the abrogation of Article 370. Its larger aim is to make media a mere carrier of the “news” that the government intends to disseminate, and to prevent it from peddling “fake” news and indulging in “anti-national” activities.

​Digital Activism and Cultural Resistance

The communication void created in the Kashmir valley in August 2019 ironically became the medium for Kashmiris to reclaim their history and memorialise their suffering.

Diminishing the Role of Parliament: The Case of the Jammu and Kashmir Reorganisation Bill

On 5 August 2019, Home Minister Amit Shah introduced the Jammu and Kashmir Reorganisation Bill in the Rajya Sabha amid flagrant violations of rules and procedures. Thus, lawmakers voted on and eventually passed a bill that they did not get a fair chance to read, analyse or discuss.

Reading between the Lines of the Concerned Citizens’ Group Report on Jammu and Kashmir

Examining the situation on the ground in Jammu and Kashmir, the article argues that while the Concerned Citizens’ Group Report harbours a few blind spots in defining communalism and separatism, its contribution to comparing the situation in Jammu vis-à-vis Kashmir cannot be discounted.

Rule of the ‘Lawless Law’

The arbitrary and indiscriminate use of the Public Safety Act, 1978 to stifle political dissent in the Kashmir Valley shows a blatant disregard for the Constitution and the right to personal liberty enshrined therein. An examination of 100 cases in which Kashmiri youth were detained under the draconian PSA following the death of Hizb-ul-Mujahideen Commander Burhan Wani reveals that both the state executive and the judiciary are complicit in perpetuating this “lawless law.”

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