ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Before the Gig Economy

Studying Delhi’s radio taxi industry, this paper traces the transitional process of traditional taxi services in the capital to radio taxi services and finally to the current app-based taxi aggregators. The radio taxi companies ruptured old kinship ties and informal relations with a combination of technology, surveillance, and finance—a process app-based taxi aggregators have further refined. There is also an account of the labour struggles in the industry that preceded the advent of the platform economy.

Performance of Indian Information Technology Sector

In this age of computers, the development and advancement of the information technology sector can push a developing economy into the developed countries category. The present study found that the IT sector of India has experienced boom and prosperity during the first decade of this century. Therefore, the supportive policies and acts, such as the Information Technology Act, 2000, National Broadband Policy, 2004, and Special Economic Zones Act, 2005 have favourable impact on the information technology sector. Meanwhile, it is moving towards recession in the second half of the second decade of this century. However, the study confirms good performance of India’s information technology sector in terms of its contribution to the gross domestic product, foreign exchange earnings, and employment generation in the Indian economy.

IT: Deconstructing the Bust that Followed the Boom

This article argues that the IT wave never constituted an exception to the conventional laws of economics and uses traditional economic concepts to explain why the bust that followed the boom was only to be expected and how it does not invalidate the (actual as well as potential) benefits associated with IT.

Indian Software Industry Development

Export-led growth has been the mainstay of the spectacular performance of the Indian software industry. However, continued growth at the blistering pace set in the 1990s faces significant challenges in the form of growing scarcity of talent, rising wage costs and emerging competition. Besides, the recent slowdown in the US has lowered growth estimates for the infotech industry. The Indian software industry cannot afford to be complacent if it wants to maintain its position as a premier purveyor of software services. The industry will need to consolidate its strengths and move up the value chain if it is to maintain its head start on the competition. Most importantly, it will have to invest substantially in R and D and create linkages to encourage career prospects for researchers in engineering.
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