ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Recasting Politics and Reimagining Islam: Beyond Contested Nationalisms in Bangladesh

Tracing the journey of Bangladesh from a secular state to an Islamic state against the backdrop of Bangladeshi Nationalism, Samia Huq discusses the potential of Islam in the everyday public sphere in light of women’s Quranic discussion circles.

Jazba, Restraint and Political Action: New Dimensions of Islamic Politics in Pakistan

Charting out the new dimension of politics in Pakistan, Iqbal Singh Sevea describes the rise of the new political party, Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan, with its leader, Khadim Hussain Rizvi, openly supportive of a fundamentalist form of Islam. He encouraged supporters to organise protests against blasphemous acts. On the other hand, Islamic intellectuals such as Javed Ahmad Ghamidi preach a more liberal form of Islam. With the recent death of Rizvi, it remains to be seen in which direction politics in Pakistan will move.

Social Forces and Ideology in the Making of Pakistan

Religious parties were implacably hostile to the Pakistan Movement. When, inaugurating Pakistan's constituent assembly, Jinnah proclaimed Pakistan's secular ideology he was voicing the established secular ideological position that the Muslim League had adhered to throughout its career. Fundamentalist Islamic ideology played no part in the origins of Pakistan, although contemporary ideologues of Islamic fundamentalism, including academics, claim that it was Islamic ideology and slogans that created Pakistan and that they therefore have the right to decide its future.

Demise of Islamism?

Unholy War: Terror in the Name of Islam by John L Esposito; Oxford University Press, 2002; pp 196, Rs 295. Jihad: The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia by Ahmed Rashid; Orient Longman, 2002; pp 281, Rs 295

Musharraf's Quest for a 'Progressive and Dynamic' Pakistan

Pakistan has three clear models of modernisation it could emulate - China, India and Saudi Arabia. But while, Saudi Arabia has oil reserves in plenty and China, its diaspora's dollars, Pakistan remains poorly blessed with resources. It has only India to look to for emulation. India, in turn, requires Pakistan's hand of friendship for maintaining communal harmony and vice versa. More than ever before, India and Pakistan need each other.

Madrasa Education and the Condition of Indian Muslims

The Indian nation cannot march forward with a major segment of its largest minority group remaining backward, illiterate, unenlightened and weak. It is the duty of every section of Indian society to help in the mainstreaming of this section. But the issue of modernisation of madrasa education brings up the vested interests of fundamentalist elements trying to protect their turf and the political system which strives to utilise the backward for electoral gain. Strangely, the interests of the non-secular religious groups and those of the so-called 'secular and progressive' politicians merge, reinforcing one another.

Afghanistan, Islam and the Left

In the debate on the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and its violent manifestations, the space has been dominated by those who take a strictly religious position and those who are apologists of the realpolitik of the US-led western alliance. A Leftist perspective has been missing in the whole discourse.
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