ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Bad Bank, Bad Loans and the Indian Banking Mess

This article looks into the reasons for the large non-performing assets of the Indian banks, particularly public sector banks, and the various steps taken by the government and the Reserve Bank of India to tackle the issue of bad debts. It also examines if a bad bank is the magic wand that can...

Bank Privatisation

There is a buzz in the air about privatisation of some of the public sector banks (PSBs). There has been talk of privatising Industrial Development Bank of India (IDBI Bank) in financial year (FY) 2020–21. Of the disinvestment target for the year of Rs 2.1 trillion, Rs 90 billion was to have come...

Financial Misconduct, Fear of Prosecution and Bank Lending

The issue and relevance of financial misconduct and fear of prosecution on the lending behaviour of Indian banks is investigated by combining bank-level financial and prudential variables during 2008–18 with a unique hand-collected data set on financial misconduct and fear of prosecution. The findings indicate that, in the presence of financial misconduct, state-owned banks typically cut back on credit creation and instead increase their quantum of risk-free investment. In terms of magnitude, a 10% increase in financial misconduct lowers lending by 0.2% along with a roughly commensurate increase in investment. In terms of the channels, it is found that private banks increase provisioning to maintain their credit growth, although the evidence for state-owned banks is less persuasive.

Organisation of Regulatory Functions:A Single Regulator?

Since the beginning of the financial sector reforms in early 1990s, boundaries between products and intermediaries have been blurring rapidly. The entry of several large government-owned as well as non-governmental financial sector participants in a variety of related domains such as securities trading, investment banking, commercial and retail banking, insurance and asset management which are regulated by independent bodies has posed some unique supervisory challenges for the Indian financial system. The paper attempts to argue that such a system of regulation not only artificially fragments the financial markets but also exposes the system to the very real danger of participants behaving as mini-super-regulators as they seek to optimally allocate capital dynamically between these fragmented market

Risk and Productivity Change of Public Sector Banks

While the relationship between portfolio risk and capital and its interrelationship with operating efficiency has been explored elsewhere, limited evidence has been forthcoming on the interrelationships among capital, non-performing loans and productivity. The paper makes an attempt to examine the same in the Indian context. Using data on public sector banks (PSBs) for the period 1995-96 through 2000-2001, the paper finds capital, risk and productivity change to be intertwined, with each reinforcing and to a degree, complementing the other. The results imply that inadequately capitalised banks have lower productivity and are subject to a higher degree of regulatory pressure than adequately capitalised ones. Finally, the results lend some credence to the belief that lowering government ownership tends to improve productivity.

Industrial Finance and Capital Market

Given the current state of the financial institutions and banks, it will take many years before they are integrated into the capital market framework thus bridging the artificial gulf that exists today between the two. The basic function of financial institutions and banks and the financial/capital markets is to facilitate the transfer of funds from the surplus to the deficit pockets. The main thrust of policy now should be to create seamless linkages between DFIs/banks and capital markets to facilitate this process of transfer from the ultimate savers to the ultimate users at minimum cost. Such a policy should also ensure a neutral stance towards banks and the capital markets thus making for an environment where there is efficient resource allocation as well as a certain discipline among users of funds.
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