ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Gandhi, Bhagat Singh and What the Historians Say

Ever since the death sentence for Bhagat Singh, Rajguru and Sukhdev in the Lahore conspiracy case-II was pronounced on 7 October 1930 by a controversial three-member special tribunal established by British colonial government, the imperative to save their lives became a national issue. The general perception was that Mahatma Gandhi, who was thought to be the tallest national leader of India at that time, could have achieved this imperative. But it was not to be.

Revolutionary Legacy of Bhagat Singh

Bhagat Singh's life (September 28, 1907-March 23, 1931), work and thought were marked by an uncompromising struggle against colonialism and imperialism, together with radical opposition to capitalism, communalism and the caste system. This article is a spirited account of his life, his revolutionary activity, his ideals, his opinions and his legacy. It was on April 8, 1929 that Bhagat Singh and B K Dutt threw non-lethal bombs in the Central Assembly with a view "to make the deaf hear", and raised the slogans "Inquilab Zindabad" and "Down with Imperialism", which caught the imagination of the Indian people. Perhaps at no other point in the life of India since 1947 has the reference to these two slogans become more important than today, as the country marks the hundredth birth anniversary of Bhagat Singh.

Multiple Meanings of 1857 for Indians in Britain

Many historians and commentators have discussed the disparate roles and responses of various Britons and Indians in India as well as the opinions and public policies of Britons in Britain during the struggle of 1857. This paper complements such work by highlighting how Indians living in British society related to those events and also the ways in which British attitudes toward them changed before, during and after 1857.

Steel Industry : Will the Good Times Last?

Will the Good Times Last? After nine years of drift, a revival deal for Indian Iron and Steel Co (Iisco) may finally be in the offing. The rehabilitation package for SAIL

Re-Envisioning the State

Space, Territory and the State: New Readings in International Politics edited by Ranabir Samaddar; Orient Longman, New Delhi, 2002; pp 263, Rs 45

China's Accession to WTO

This paper attempts to evaluate the implications of China's accession to the WTO in terms of its impact on the country's exports, imports and foreign investment inflows, and also discusses the likely effect of these developments for the Indian economy. The paper argues that in case of China, the changes consequent to accession to WTO will see an increase in economic activity, leading to a higher GDP growth rate. For India, the Chinese challenge can be met only if we strengthen the competitiveness of our economy further by undertaking additional reforms and improving infrastructure.

Globalisation and the Management of Indian Cities

Cities in Europe and North America have been through three decades of innovation in institutions and practices as they seek to accommodate the new environment of global economic integration. Many have learned to facilitate the creation of new economies that have institutionalised incremental change with a changing political consensus, liberating themselves in part from those rigidities that make for extreme vulnerability in conditions of crisis. The same is also true of cities in Latin America and in China. However, elsewhere - including possibly India - the sovereign state is often still struggling to retain its monopoly control. In doing so, the state stifles the full potential role of cities to advance the world, to reduce the burden of world poverty. Liberating the cities is thus a key part of the agenda for the new century and for the eradication of poverty.

India and Pakistan: Deja Vu Gone Stale

The compulsions bringing New Delhi and Islamabad again to the negotiating table are both internal and external. But fits of uneasy truce in Indo-Pak relations will always end in long bouts of despair as long as both countries continue to be ruled by politicians who can survive only by cynical manipulation.

Aid: Old Morality and New Realities

The Indian government has tried to signal a change in its status from 'aid-taker' to 'aid-giver'. The basic purpose of this move is political, to support India's claim to a new status in international affairs, but it is important to pay attention to its economic motivation too.

Repatriation of Sri Lankan Refugees

The success of the planned repatriation of Sri Lankan refugees from India depends on resolving several issues left over from the two earlier rounds of repatriation. The issue also brings to the fore the importance of having formal guidelines in India to deal with the problems of rehabilitation, repatriation and resettlement of refugees.

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