ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Do Normative Values Need an Address?

Certain questions that arguably involve the denial of access both by the state and socially hostile society to basic human needs and natural rights, such as freedom, warrant both articulation and amelioration. If spiritual goods such as freedom, which are essential for human flourishing, and...

Distanced to Dire Circumstances

In the most perilous situations, those that are least protected by the state are the first to be compelled to make a choice between disease and starvation.

Police Atrocities and the Quest for Justice

In recent times, we have witnessed an exponential increase in incidence of police atrocities all over the country. Catapulted by the June 2020 case of brutal custodial torture and killings of Jayaraj and Bennix in Thoothukudi, Tamil Nadu, this article examines the issue through human rights and legal perspectives. It discusses the gaps in the law and its implementation, and examines ways of addressing the same.

In Memory of K Balagopal: Mathematician, Lawyer, and Social Activist

K Balagopal, through his work for the subaltern in Andhra Pradesh, has left an indelible mark on its sociopolitical landscape.

Revisiting India’s Exclusionary Approach to Human Rights

India must re-evaluate its human rights discourse to go beyond eurocentric notions and focus on overcoming specific marginalisations.

How Do We Rescue Human Rights from Rhetoric?

The human rights discourse today needs to introspect on how it can visualise competing degrees of resolution of human rights ideas advocated by different agents, without harming the principles that are worth retaining.

Matting of Hair among Women in South-western India

Matting of hair is a neglected health problem in India with religious undertones and paucity of research on it. To capture the experiential understanding of matting of hair among women in south-western India, an interpretive phenomenological study was conducted. The thematic accounts of affected women uncovered the health and human rights marginalisation surrounding the matting of hair, effectively making it a neglected harmful cultural practice.

Prisoners’ Right to Write: Why SC Rulings Should be Taken Seriously by Prison Authorities

This article discusses the legal jurisprudence and policies affecting a prisoner’s right to express and write, also highlighting how such a right in practice is being infringed as a casual practice of prison administration. The article stresses why writing should be a duly recognised right of the prisoner. Further, the article shows how the writings of prisoners have contributed to reforms in prison conditions in India.

Partitioned Urbanity

The partition of British India precipitated a set of instruments of governance that shaped occupations, land-use patterns, and forms of citizenship in urban hinterlands. This process is explored through an ethnographic and archival study of a village in Kolkata’s urban periphery, populated by an oppressed caste community called Namasudras, who had suffered repeated displacements. Namasudra refugee labour was crucial in the making of Kolkata’s suburban infrastructure, prompted by a process of state-led “deagrarianisation” and inter-community politico–economic competition that also displaced the local Muslim peasantry.

A 'Human Rights Giant'

Asma Jahangir, a “human rights giant,” lives on as an inspiration and source of strength for millions fighting for rights and justice. This is a portrait of an incredibly courageous woman, lovingly drawn with a collection of memories and anecdotes.

Terror, Innocence, and the Wages of Official Prejudice

Public awareness of the scale of continuing state injustice in India is not very high, this article points out. It goes on to show that a telling selectivity in popular outrage and the application of the majesty of the law reveal a troubling majoritarian bias in society and the law. This does not sit well with the Constitution’s promise of equal treatment to all before the law.

Female Education

Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is perceived as an important tool for women’s empowerment through which women can break different sociocultural barriers. But a qualitative study conducted among 45 married urban women in Delhi and Yamuna Nagar district of Haryana explains how education is used to maintain the existing gender hierarchies and gender division of labour. It highlights that reproduction and transformation of social structures are evident in a novel manner where ideas of women’s emancipation and subordination coexist.

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