ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Human RightsSubscribe to Human Rights

Status of Women’s Reproductive Health in Bihar

Based on the National Family Health Survey data for 2015–16 and 2019–20, the article shows the precarious sexual and reproductive health of women in Bihar. While there are some improvements in this period, multiple indicators emerging from social and institutional determinants continue to show poor SRH of women in the state.

How Can We Rethink Police Accountability in India?

Use of force by the police is a substantial problem in India. To a large extent, the measures so far have focused on police’s functional autonomy and independence from political pressures. Yet, this also merits the question of whether fixing the political–police relationship alone will lead to more accountable police. While such top-down reforms have been pending since the time of independence, they have overlooked the simultaneous need for bottom-up approaches focusing on police empowerment. To rethink police accountability in India, we must focus on two core areas—community policing, and better training. These structural measures focus on changing the police–public power equation and mark the shift from a colonial police force to one that is true to the spirit of democratic policing.

Israel’s Impunity, Continued Occupation and Palestinian Resistance

The recent Israeli aggression in Gaza Strip has drawn the world’s attention to the plight of Palestinians once again. The fact that Palestine has remained under occupation for decades, despite the claims of triumph of democracy and human rights, has exposed the nexus between imperialism and global narratives woven with the aid of popular media. The same media is, yet again, trying to twist the facts to vilify the victims of occupation and their resistance against it. Such attempts need to be countered by putting the Palestine–Israel question in a proper historical perspective.

Do Normative Values Need an Address?

Certain questions that arguably involve the denial of access both by the state and socially hostile society to basic human needs and natural rights, such as freedom, warrant both articulation and amelioration. If spiritual goods such as freedom, which are essential for human flourishing, and...

Distanced to Dire Circumstances

In the most perilous situations, those that are least protected by the state are the first to be compelled to make a choice between disease and starvation.

Police Atrocities and the Quest for Justice

In recent times, we have witnessed an exponential increase in incidence of police atrocities all over the country. Catapulted by the June 2020 case of brutal custodial torture and killings of Jayaraj and Bennix in Thoothukudi, Tamil Nadu, this article examines the issue through human rights and legal perspectives. It discusses the gaps in the law and its implementation, and examines ways of addressing the same.

In Memory of K Balagopal: Mathematician, Lawyer, and Social Activist

K Balagopal, through his work for the subaltern in Andhra Pradesh, has left an indelible mark on its sociopolitical landscape.

Revisiting India’s Exclusionary Approach to Human Rights

India must re-evaluate its human rights discourse to go beyond eurocentric notions and focus on overcoming specific marginalisations.

How Do We Rescue Human Rights from Rhetoric?

The human rights discourse today needs to introspect on how it can visualise competing degrees of resolution of human rights ideas advocated by different agents, without harming the principles that are worth retaining.

Matting of Hair among Women in South-western India

Matting of hair is a neglected health problem in India with religious undertones and paucity of research on it. To capture the experiential understanding of matting of hair among women in south-western India, an interpretive phenomenological study was conducted. The thematic accounts of affected women uncovered the health and human rights marginalisation surrounding the matting of hair, effectively making it a neglected harmful cultural practice.

Prisoners’ Right to Write: Why SC Rulings Should be Taken Seriously by Prison Authorities

This article discusses the legal jurisprudence and policies affecting a prisoner’s right to express and write, also highlighting how such a right in practice is being infringed as a casual practice of prison administration. The article stresses why writing should be a duly recognised right of the prisoner. Further, the article shows how the writings of prisoners have contributed to reforms in prison conditions in India.

Partitioned Urbanity

The partition of British India precipitated a set of instruments of governance that shaped occupations, land-use patterns, and forms of citizenship in urban hinterlands. This process is explored through an ethnographic and archival study of a village in Kolkata’s urban periphery, populated by an oppressed caste community called Namasudras, who had suffered repeated displacements. Namasudra refugee labour was crucial in the making of Kolkata’s suburban infrastructure, prompted by a process of state-led “deagrarianisation” and inter-community politico–economic competition that also displaced the local Muslim peasantry.

Pages

Back to Top