ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The Unresolved Issues in Controlling Covid-19

Vaccinating the entire population of the country against COVID-19 is a hard feat to achieve given the weak health infrastructure of the country and various other factors like confusion and vaccine hesitancy. A strict lockdown and safety measures are the only way to deal with the second wave of the deadly disease.

Interrogating the AI Hype: A Situated Politics of Machine Learning in Indian Healthcare

Though they may seem as such, AI technologies are not merely technical systems. Rather, they are constitutive, and indicative, of the sociopolitical contexts that they are situated in. This is part of a six-article series on questions surrounding data, privacy, artificial intelligence, among others. You can read the introduction here .

Polio Elimination: A Response

In Manoj Grover’s letter “Polio Elimination” (EPW, 17 May 2014) on two points in my article “Can the Polio Elimination Success Story Breed More Successes in India?” (EPW, 5 April 2014), the writer seems to answer the question in the negative, saying: “I cannot imagine any internal [read Indian]...

Polio Elimination

In the article titled “Can the Polio Elimination Success Story Breed More Successes in India?” by T Jacob John (EPW, 5 April 2014), the author makes a comment that India would have eliminated polio decades ago had it used inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) in the universal immunisation programme...

Can the Polio Elimination Success Story Breed More Successes in India?

Overcoming formidable biological and sociocultural barriers, India eliminated wild polioviruses from its territory in January 2011. Looking back, it is obvious that the best policy would have been to introduce the inactivated poliovirus vaccine to prevent polio in every vaccinated child, and to use oral poliovirus vaccine by pulse campaigns to eliminate WPVs rapidly. This would have eliminated polio decades ago. Now that WPVs have been eliminated, IPV must be introduced as a prelude to withdrawing OPV. The road ahead is bumpy, but with the important lessons learnt so far, India can no longer pretend that it is too difficult to design a permanent public health infrastructure to control other communicable and non-communicable diseases.
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