ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

GlobalisationSubscribe to Globalisation

Dietary Diversity during COVID-19 in India

The article reports the findings on the changing dietary patterns of Indian households during COVID-19, based on an analysis of the Consumer Pyramids Household Survey. The impact of the pandemic on diet composition was most severe for the poor and the deprived, who substituted inferior cereals for expensive cereals and spent lower amounts on nourishing foods such as fruits and vegetables.

Respatialising the Digitised and Globalised Sex Industry

There is a consensus that sex work and the sex industry have been globalised owing to factors such as the development of sex tourism, neo-liberal economic policies and the influence of the sexual revolution. This paper attempts to pose the question: How have digitisation and globalisation altered the spatiality of sex work and the sex industry? I use Saskia Sassen’s framework provided in "The City: Localizations of the Global" in this attempt to propose a new lens for understanding the spatial changes that sex work has undergone. The notion of the globalised sex industry’s spatiality needs to be reconfigured—spatiality of sex work can no longer be seen as purely physical as there is an imbrication of the digital in the non-digital. The globalised sex industry is a local environment placed in a global network, whose notions of centrality have changed as well with changes in the spatiality of the functional and locational centrality of the red-light districts. This diffusion of centrality has manifested itself at the level of the world system as well via the formation of “third-world” business centres.

Managing Transition to a Low-carbon Electricity Mix in India

Demand for electricity in India is growing due to the increase in GDP and quality of life along with structural changes in the energy sector leading to the increase in the percentage share of electricity in the total final consumption of energy. Decarbonisation of the energy sector is a necessity, and it should be achieved without negatively affecting economic growth of the country. It can be best managed by having a diverse portfolio of technologies as diversity provides supply security, resilience, and hedging against price fluctuations. Therefore, all low-carbon technologies—hydro, nuclear, solar, and wind—should be exploited and provided with a level playing field.

 

Reproduction of Informal Enterprises in India

Informality and diversity of institutional forms have been marked as distinct features of India’s postcolonial capitalist development. The present paper considers the conditions of reproduction of informal enterprises, specifically focusing on the living and working conditions of artisan labour in the silk-weaving cluster of Sualkuchi in Assam. The study indicates that kinship, gender, and caste act as regulative forces, influencing the form and scale of production, ownership, contract, and exchange relations. The results point to the significance of non-capitalist institutional arrangement in the reproduction of the handloom sector under contemporary capitalism.

Global Value Chains of MNCs and Indian SMEs

The rapidly expanding global value chains of multinational corporations are increasingly dominating international trade, which emerging economies like India can hardly afford to ignore. The limited presence of Indian small and medium enterprises in the GVCs of MNCs can be traced back to a negligible share of internationalised SMEs, which is primarily due to a weak innovation base, owing to weak networks of SMEs, particularly weak inter-firm linkages. These issues can be overcome by building and strengthening regional innovation systems and by establishing a multipurpose science and technology commission in the clusters of SMEs.

 

Globalisation and the Indian Farmer

The article analyses the impact of globalisation on income and levels of living in the rural sector. It also discusses the changes in India’s stance on food security in global negotiations.

 

Modern Monetary Theory, Deglobalisation and the Dollar

The article explores the interconnections between the rise of modern monetary theory, deglobalisation and the international monetary system. It discusses the evolution of the international monetary system from Bretton Woods One to Bretton Woods Three, and how this transition is linked to globalisation, and deglobalisation, or the shifts in global imbalances. Finally, it makes an evaluation of the impact of these developments on the role played by the dollar in the international monetary system and its possible future trajectory.

 

The Capital–Labour Rupture and the World Order

More than the rise of China, it is cyber-capitalism that is the driving force of the current changes in the global political economy. Emboldened by new age technologies, the capital is now breaking itself free from labour.

Brexit is Not Just about Exiting the European Union: A Reading List

The United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union is indicative of not only its own narrow self-perception but also of the rise of an anti-immigration and racist stance put forth by right-wing groups. */ */

The Future of Globalisation

An analysis of globalisation in a historical perspective can help us understand how the past or the present may shape the future. In so doing, this article outlines the contours of the present era of globalisation since its inception, circa 1975, to find that the successive epochs of globalisation during the second millennium came to an abrupt end because of their own consequences embedded in the process. Given this, the article seeks to focus on the present conjuncture, at the intersection of economics and politics, when globalisation is again in crisis to reflect on its future.

How Globalisation Has Diluted Workers’ Rights

This reading list looks at how globalisation has changed the relations of production.

Pages

Back to Top