ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Ukraine War and the Perils of ‘Self-determination’

The right of “self-determination of the people” is a double-edged sword. It has been used by postcolonial nations to reclaim their territories and economy. The idea has also been exploited by the powerful countries to divide the world on ethnic and religious lines to advance their hegemony through humanitarian interventions.

Between Empire(s), Great Powers, and Moral Calculus

Through a reading of the United Nations Security Council resolutions 2593 and 2615 and India’s call on Ukraine, it is argued that rising powers like India need to be more attentive to the politics of strategic autonomy that rests not only on a reading of the moral calculus but also the politics of empire and the imperial logics that underpin great power interests.

Geoeconomics of Trade Agreements and the Pacific Rim

The Pacific Rim region is a dynamic geoeconomic space of great power competition where many trade agreements and economic blocs have evolved over the last few decades. This article evaluates the insertion of the four economies of the United States, China, India, and the European Union to understand the evolving architecture of trade relations in this region.

Rescripting India’s Engagement with Afghanistan

The ways of rescripting India’s language of engagement with non-state armed groups like the Taliban are discussed. The engagement essentially does not accord moral legitimacy to acts of violence by the Taliban, but pushes for refashioning India’s image from being an “alien” other to a “differentiated” other.

India’s Afghan Policy: Challenges and Anxieties

India can only wait patiently and watch the situation in Afghanistan before initiating any action.

Afghanistan: Present Tense, Future Imperfect

The Taliban takeover cannot be understood outside the hegemonic economic and geopolitical interests.

India’s Civilisational Identity and the World Order

As the neo-liberal world order declines, non-Western powers are uniquely equipped to manage the power transition and contestations over the basic tenets of the emerging system. India’s civilisational ethos of reconciling different ideas will be of immense value in navigating the uncertainty and turmoil at a critical juncture of world history.

A Manifesto in Disguise

Subjects of Modernity: Time-space, Disciplines, Margins by Saurabh Dube, Manchester University Press, 2017; pp 248, £75 (hard cover).

Vernacular Nations

Postcolonial Asia offers at least seven types of states and nations. In their somewhat uncritical pursuit of total nationalism, territorial Asian states compete with their archipelagic cousins. The sea gypsy nations--spread across the South China Sea and other East Asian states--reject the monopoly of land as the only inhabitable space, discounting territory as an essential constituent of a nation. Ironically, while history kept them outside the fold of the territorial states, the present attempts to co-opt them. Only by challenging, as the Asian sea gypsies do, land's claim to being the sole inhabitable territory within law, and rethinking the sea as a place of danger can we truly vernacularise our statist imaginations.

Us and Them in the New World Order

The world did not radically change on September 11. The reasons for that act of terror lie in the shift in the geopolitical balance of power in the past quarter of a century. The contrasts that already existed are hardening into segments of inclusion and exclusion.

Terrorist Strike in US and Its Aftermath

A sense of history should help policy-makers in India and Pakistan to put into perspective their respective expectations of the US - as in any relationship among unequals - as the latter pursues its longterm global battle against 'international terrorism'. Our past experience provides ample grounds for caution.

India, Kashmir and War against Terrorism

India's positions and postures in the post-September 11 period have neither promoted the national interest nor raised the country's moral and political stature in the world.

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