ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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How Much Time Is Too Much Time?

The fi erce debates surrounding the issue of unpaid domestic labour in the 21st century have resulted in political parties promising to monetise the work undertaken by housewives in India. The recent “Time Use in India 2019” report released by the National Statistical Offi ce adds to the discourse that problematises the disproportionate differences in domestic division of labour between women and men. This article uses the larger fi ndings of the NSO survey to probe the pattern of time-use at the national and state level that may be explained by pre-existing gender norms and behaviours.

All Work, No Pay

In a judgment delivered on 5 January 2021, the Supreme Court of India emphasised the importance of fixing a monetary value for the housework done by women as homemakers. This article analyses the contemporary developments in this regard, through economic, legal and feminist perspectives. The article argues that in line with judicial precedents, the present judgment provides an impetus to value the labour and services of homemakers, which would give such work the much-needed social recognition and value. It further argues that while it is a welcome trend to attribute a pecuniary value to homemakers’ services after their demise, for purposes of determining quantum of compensation, a similar approach is warranted in matrimonial disputes in determining alimony and in dividing matrimonial property.

Economic Cost of Gender Gap

To truly close the gender gap, gender equality must be mainstreamed into economic policymaking.

Involuntary Exclusion and the Formal Financial Sector

Financial inclusion is a policy priority in India, with the focus on the supply-side of the financial inclusion drive and programmes such as the Pradhan Mantri Jan-Dhan Yojana. Insufficient attention, however, has been paid to the use of banking services by people at the bottom of the pyramid in order to understand what constrains them from using the formal financial services on offer. This study looks at the causes of involuntary exclusion from formal financial services in the slums of Delhi.
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