ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Towards an Alternative Indian Tea Economy

The Indian tea economy is undergoing acute transformations, with the divestment of tea companies from plantations leaving thousands of plantation workers jobless, and small tea growers struggling with a general lack of knowledge and their dependency on bought leaf factories and intermediaries. A review of the current trends in the Indian tea market and two alternative sites in Darjeeling indicates the potential of solidary enterprises and also exposes the difficulties these groups face to emancipate themselves from the colonial-style tea companies.

Majoritarian Rationale and Common Goals

Looking at existing policy instruments and goals, and the economic and social outcomes they promise to deliver, it is argued that majoritarian politics and social and cultural outcomes are not part of fringe thinking. The politics of hate actually works to build a consensus for ruling class economics. It is not surprising, therefore, that the only "nationalist outlook" of our times is to stand firmly behind the policy programme for the global investor.

Effect of Environmental Regulation on a Firm's Performance

Using a policy experiment that involved the imposition of a technical regulation by the Ministry of Environment and Forests on the Indian leather and textile industries in 1997, firm-level data set is used to study trade, adaptation, innovation and survival effects and how they vary by firm size. The study finds that (i) regulation led to significant gains from trade through the use of improved raw materials and technological change, especially for the big firms, (ii) use of high-quality raw materials and productivity levels significantly account for the exit decision of a firm, and (iii) regulation significantly affects the exit probabilities of all firms across size distribution.

Calm before the Storm?

It is generally believed that India is doing far better than most emerging market economies in these times of global economic turmoil. Emerging markets are facing capital flight, with large-scale outflows, especially since the second half of 2015, with the trend expected to continue in 2016. India has been less affected than others, but is clearly vulnerable due to the large number of Indian firms that are exposed to external borrowings, a weak rupee, a year or more of declining merchandise exports, falling corporate profitability, and stressed corporate balance sheets.

Glimpses from the Past: Export Strategy for the Take-Off

This article written by Manmohan Singh, then a young economics scholar, was published in the Special issue of July 1963 of the Economic Weekly . Fifty years later, he occupies the position of the Prime Minister of India, yet the debate over India's export strategy remains as vexed as ever. EPW brings you this article from its rich achives to foster debate and discussion on issues that remain as relevant now as it was back then.

Inflation : RBI May Well Be Right

RBI May Well Be Right The outlook for inflation in 2003-04 is expected to remain benign, according to the Reserve Bank. This at a time when inflation, measured by point-to-point changes in the wholesale price index, is well over 6 per cent and the monsoon, or at least the Met office, promises another difficult year. International commodity prices, too, show signs of hardening, despite the welcome signs of crude prices remaining soft. Is it time then to take the central bank

West Asia : Market for Mangoes and More

Market for Mangoes and More The Indian mango has been an unexpected casualty of the US war on Iraq. The conflict has left mango exports to the Gulf region stranded in transit, dealing a blow to exporters as west Asian countries, mainly Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Oman, account for 70-80 per cent of India

Australia in India

If the 1990s marked an intensification of the process of `globalisation', within the policy discourse of the higher education sector that process has manifested itself through the idea of the `international university'. In part, internationalisation implies a redefinition of higher education as a globally marketed commodity or as an export oriented `industry'. These developments are examined by means of an analysis of the internationalisation of Australian education, and the operational procedures, strategies, and expansionist market objectives of Australian higher education institutions in India. It is argued that, under the hegemony of neo-liberal ideology, these international linkages are emerging as a result of the transformation and restructuring of the higher education sector in both nations.

Calcutta Diary

History marches on. Consider the colourless budget the union finance minister presented on the last day of last month. Even he could not but admit the sorry reality of the economy having come to a screeching halt.

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