ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Crisis in Indian Universities

Liberal Education and Its Discontents: The Crisis in the Indian University by Shashikala Srinivasan, New Delhi: Routledge, 2019; pp 246, ` 995.

Household Consumption Expenditure Inequality in Rural India (1993–94 to 2011–12)

The comparative role of determinants of household-level consumption expenditure inequalities (henceforth, inequalities) in rural India between two sub-periods, 1994–2005 and 2005–12 are examined, using three rounds of the National Sample Survey Consumer Expenditure Survey. The changes in the components of consumption expenditure and population characteristics are explored that explain inequalities during the two sub-periods, which represent distinct policy environments. We use both a priori and regression-based decomposition methods for the analysis. We find that there is a complete reversal of the role of education in explaining inequalities. It shifted from being an inequality-increasing factor during 1994–2005 to an inequality-equalising factor during 2005–12. This reversal is induced by decreasing consumption returns to education due to the depressed job market. The role of locational factors has increased in explaining the increase in inequalities over time. The non-food components induce an increase in the overall inequalities via an increased expenditure on durables. The within-group component contributes the most to the level of and change in inequalities.

Determinants and Dynamics of Food Insecurity during COVID-19 in Rural Eastern India

Using comprehensive telephone survey data from 2,599 households, the paper estimates the status of food insecurity using the food insecurity experience scale in rural households in eastern India. The results indicate that households belonging to lower social strata with less land and fewer years of education are more likely to suffer from food insecurity.

Inter (Caste) Love Stories: Experiential Eye (I) in Fandry and Sairat

To read anti-caste context in cinema one needs to have an experiential eye. The ones at the receiving end of caste-based discrimination and thereof inflicted humiliation by the orthodox social codes find resistance as the only way to achieve “liberty, equality and freedom.” In this relation, the paper focuses upon two Marathi films Fandry (2013) and Sairat (2016) directed by Nagaraj Manjule. The paper seeks to present the experiential perspective about Dalit visuality which has started to gain a wider recognition in interdisciplinary studies from verbal to the visual literature.

De facto Privatisation in Education and Populist Budgets

This article examines de facto privatisation and populist budgets of the central and Delhi state governments. The delay in releasing grants to 12 constituent colleges of the University of Delhi shows a correspondence between privatisation and populism in implementing the National Education Policy 2020, thus resulting in socio-economic inequality and a delay in achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 4, namely quality and inclusive education for all.

Platform Capitalism and Edtech

For-profit edtech needs to be banned, and the government must play an active regulatory role.

The Edtech Leviathan

In June 2021, Google and BYJU’s announced a partnership to provide education services in India. By offering education content gratis and supporting “personalised learning,” Google and BYJU’s see themselves as facilitating the transition from the traditional brick-and-mortar classroom to a virtual learning space, potentially benefiting millions of Indian students during and beyond the pandemic. Examining the implications of this tie-up, in the context of commercialisation of education and the increasing concentration of power with monopolistic corporations, it is argued that private platforms in the unregulated edtech sector are incentivised to prioritise growth above all else and their programmes are sharply opposed to the socially transformative aims of education.

The NEP 2020 and Future of Masters Programmes in Management Education

Management education in India is offered as a degree by universities and as a postgraduate diploma by the All India Council for Technical Education approved stand-alone institutions. The present work focuses on the challenges of the pedagogy and curriculum adopted by the management institutions offering postgraduate-level programmes. The palpability of localised curriculum with pedagogical innovations cited in the National Education Policy 2020 are critically discussed here. The higher education institutions offering degree or postgraduate diploma in management programmes are segmented into three tiers. The daunting questions and scaling of the mid-tier institutions are the focus of this critical review.

Migrant Children and ‘Free’ Education in India

Schooling of migrant children in India is compromised for various reasons, such as their mobility, disadvantaged backgrounds, and exclusionary experiences of schooling. Such contexts and experiences of migrant families and children are in stark contrast to how their aspirations and motivation are dominantly imagined by education functionaries of the state and the non-governmental organisations. Using narratives from the city of Bengaluru, this article throws light on the aforesaid discord, thereby highlighting the complex placement of migrant children with respect to inclusionary frameworks of schooling and education in India.

The Debilitating Effect of School Closures

Innovative interventions are urgently needed to strengthen learning skills.

NEP 2020 and the Language-in-Education Policy in India

The National Education Policy of India 2020 is a significant policy document laying the national-level strategy for the new millennium. It is ambitious and claims universal access to quality education as its key aim, keeping with the Sustainable Development Goal 4 of the United Nations Agenda 2030. One of the highlights of the NEP is its emphasis on mother tongue education at the primary levels in both state- and privately owned schools. The present paper critically assesses the NEP 2020, primarily in relation to the language-in-education policy. The paper argues that it presents a “contradiction of intentions,” aspiring towards inclusion of the historically disadvantaged and marginalised groups on the one hand, while practising a policy of aggressive privatisation and disinvestment in public education on the other.

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