ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Education PolicySubscribe to Education Policy

Union Budget 2022–23

The Union Budget 2022–23 proposes a step forward towards the implementation of the National Education Policy 2020 by invoking the increased use of information and communications technology as a policy instrument to repurpose education towards skill formation and to globalise Indian higher education.

NEP 2020 and the Discontinuation of the MPhil Degree

The National Education Policy 2020 provides a framework for reorganising and revamping higher education in India. Among several of its recommendations, the decision to discontinue the MPhil programme is a signifi cant one. The article makes an attempt to understand the perspective behind the move to discontinue the MPhil programme. The MPhil programme is discontinued for the more research-oriented undergraduate and master’s degrees. In a way, the discontinuation of MPhil is the collateral damage caused by the new structure of degrees that the NEP has proposed.

Policy Paradox in Higher Education

The new NOS guidelines adversely affect the higher education aspirations of marginalised students.

Platform Capitalism and Edtech

For-profit edtech needs to be banned, and the government must play an active regulatory role.

The NEP 2020 and Future of Masters Programmes in Management Education

Management education in India is offered as a degree by universities and as a postgraduate diploma by the All India Council for Technical Education approved stand-alone institutions. The present work focuses on the challenges of the pedagogy and curriculum adopted by the management institutions offering postgraduate-level programmes. The palpability of localised curriculum with pedagogical innovations cited in the National Education Policy 2020 are critically discussed here. The higher education institutions offering degree or postgraduate diploma in management programmes are segmented into three tiers. The daunting questions and scaling of the mid-tier institutions are the focus of this critical review.

NEP 2020 and the Language-in-Education Policy in India

The National Education Policy of India 2020 is a significant policy document laying the national-level strategy for the new millennium. It is ambitious and claims universal access to quality education as its key aim, keeping with the Sustainable Development Goal 4 of the United Nations Agenda 2030. One of the highlights of the NEP is its emphasis on mother tongue education at the primary levels in both state- and privately owned schools. The present paper critically assesses the NEP 2020, primarily in relation to the language-in-education policy. The paper argues that it presents a “contradiction of intentions,” aspiring towards inclusion of the historically disadvantaged and marginalised groups on the one hand, while practising a policy of aggressive privatisation and disinvestment in public education on the other.

Can Ideas Be Deleted?

The recent reduction in the secondary and higher secondary school curriculum by the Central Board of Secondary Education has resulted in relief among most students while drawing criticism from teachers, scholars and academics who see a method into the presumably random deletion of topics to reduce the workload of students. The CBSE clarified that these are one-time changes resultant of the extraordinary situation arising from COVID-19. This article raises the critical question whether removing important conceptual notions as secularism, federalism and citizenship can lead to deletion of these ideas from the political discourse and public memory.

School Education in NEP 2020

Released 34 years after the previous policy on education, the National Education Policy, 2020 is framed in a context that is unrecognisable from that of the past policies. This article examines the discursive framework underlying the current policymaking process.

National Policy on Education 2016

Any contemporary education policy will need to address the democratic and economic aspirations of the younger citizenry and must declare those concrete steps that would endure the realisation of those aims. But that has not been the case with the National Policy on Education 2016. The new education policy, as proposed, chooses not to address the fundamental issues plaguing the education system but instead, it propagates a corporate, neo-liberal, neo-cultural, a Sanskritised, global and market-oriented education system which is governed by a wholly separate and centralised bureaucracy, where state government power and oversight is minimal.
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