ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The Unemployment Paradox: Looking at Growth Without Jobs

This reading list explores the contradictory narratives that have been built around the issue of unemployment.

Absolute Decline in Employment from 2013 to 2016: In Numbers and Graphs

Employment growth in India slowed down drastically during the period 2012 to 2016, after a marginal improvement between March 2010 and March 2012, according to the latest available employment data collected by the Labour Bureau.

Economic Consequences of Demonetisation

The nature of money supply and its link with transactions in the economy are discussed, with necessary modifications on account of the presence of the unorganised sector and the black economy. This helps incorporate differentiation in the Indian economy that is useful to understand and analyse the impact of demonetisation.

Estimates of High GDP Growth for 2015-16

In producing the new series, the Central Statistics Office with its rebased National Accounts Statistics has done a studious job of marshalling diverse sources of data and weaving them together into a composite new source. However, the final picture of NAS data would have been more acceptable if better caution was exercised in using new concepts as well as new sources of data, and in weighing the growth results against frequent and extensive revisions. The CSO has failed to refine the growth results juxtaposed against the repetitive and substantial revisions that the data sources have impelled and have completely ignored the analytical construct of gross domestic product at factor cost.

Migration, Bachelorhood and Discontent among the Patidars

Juxtaposing data collected in the 1950s with data from 2013, this paper describes some of the consequences of a crisis of agriculture in India as a crisis of values and aspirations. Among a relatively prosperous Patidar community in western India, agriculture continues to be economically remunerative while farmers are considered poor. Instead, the ability to secure a job away from land, to move out of the village and possibly overseas have come to constitute new markers of status in a traditionally competitive society. The paper departs from common representations of the caste as an upwardly mobile and successful group, and focuses instead on the discontent and on those who try to achieve the new values of the caste, but fail. As a consequence of failure it shows how Patidars recur to what, from an outsider's point of view, may seem paradoxical: in order to "move up" and participate in the culture and economy of the caste, they have to "move down." In this respect, the paper also contributes to understanding the unevenness of India's growth and the contrary trends that work both to strengthen and weaken caste identity.

Man for All Seasons

John Maynard Keynes, Volume Three, Fighting for Britain 1937- 1946 by Robert Skidelsky; Macmillan, London, 2000; pp 561, price not mentioned

India and the Global Economy

The roots of India's prolonged economic stagnation and the glimmer of hope that one notices on the horizon today cannot be fully understood if one ignores the variables that conventional analysis has taught us to ignore - the social norms, culture, beliefs, and the fabric of social interaction.

How Gender Figures in Economic Theorising and Philosophy

Women's engagement with economics, in its theory and its practice, takes several forms: to draw attention to problems not addressed before; to point out how the way problems have been addressed are unhelpful or fallacious and lead to wrong conclusions and wrong prescriptions; to critique theories and tools in order to expose their inadequacy or invalidity; to refine existing tools using available frameworks so as to 'let in' gender; and to seek new tools of analysis. The engagement can also be at a more philosophical level, namely, the foundational assumptions of the discipline. This paper seeks to explore these themes.

Perspective for Economic Development of Bangladesh

The objective of this paper is to examine the possibility of Bangladesh achieving self-sustained growth for its economy, and its likely relations with the Indian economy in this context.

BANGLADESH-Aftermath of Stagnation

BANGLADESH Aftermath of Stagnation P C Verma DURING the last 24 years, while Bangladesh was a part of Pakistan, its economy stagnated. The economic policy pursued by the central government of Pakistan kept it economically backward. An analysis of the manner in which the economic policy of the central government of Pakistan was pursued may be necessary to assess the prospects for the future development of the now independent Bangladesh.

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