ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Dispute resolution systemsSubscribe to Dispute resolution systems

WTO and Rules of Origin

The WTO panel report on the Indo-US dispute over rules of origin in textile and apparel products imports shows how the Agreement on Rules of Origin could be used, and how inequitable its resolution could be. It also shows that protectionism could take new forms, and confirms some of India's worst fears if origin could be conferred other than on the basis of the restrictive criteria of substantial harmonisation of the rules of origin.

Investment on WTO Agenda

This paper examines the relevance of a multilateral framework on investment from a developing country perspective in the light of available evidence on the role of FDI in development. It also suggests the policy options that developing countries may consider at the Cancun Ministerial Conference on the issue of Trade and Investment. Further, it reflects on the approaches to make different elements of a possible multilateral framework on investment more pro-development and balanced, in case a negotiating mandate is unavoidable at Cancun.

Shalishi in West Bengal

Traditional community/village level dispute resolution systems still coexist with formal processes of justice and administration. The `shalishi' is one such method of arbitration in West Bengal that has been used by NGOs to intervene effectively in settling domestic violence cases. Shalishi scores over the more formal legal avenues of dispute resolution because of its informal set up. But deriving its legitimacy as it does from the conventional norms and values of the community it works in favour of keeping the family intact, often compromising feminist notions of empowerment.
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