ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Global Groundwater Situation

It is widely predicted that problems of groundwater overexploitation will become more acute and widespread. The challenge then is not merely supply-side innovations but to set in place a range of corrective mechanisms that would involve a shift from resource development towards resource management. Countries with severe groundwater depletion still remain hampered however by lack of information. Not only is there no systematic monitoring of groundwater occurrence and draft, but management of such resources has for long remained in private informal channels, with public agencies playing only an indirect role.

Gender Bias in South Asia

Human Development in South Asia 2000: The Gender Question by Mahbub ul Haq; Human Development Centre, Oxford University Press; pp 219.

Green Revolution: In Light and Shade

Green Revolutions Reconsidered – The Rural World of Contemporary Punjab by Himmat Singh; Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2001; pp 302, Rs 595.

Two Decades of Change in a Bangladeshi Village

This description of a revisit to village Fatepur turns on its head several existing, stereotypical notions of what constitutes development in Bangladesh. The villagers' assessment of what counts - old-fashioned investments in water control and transport infrastructure, as principal agents of progress - is in striking contrast to opinions and facts cited by NGOs and accepted as reality by many donor institutions. More importantly progress has been possible, despite several extraneous contributing factors, due to the ingenuity and vitality demonstrated by the people.

Uses of Scientific Argument

This essay seeks to carry out an apparently simple task: to recover some of the ways in which 'science' was used as a category by nationalists in late colonial India in connection with the need for 'development'. In so doing, the essay also looks at ways in which 'science' became part of a legitimating rhetoric in late colonial India.

Don't Forget the Tortoise!

 Indian Agriculture: Four Decades of Development by G S Bhalla and Gurmail Singh; Sage Publications, New Delhi, 2001; pp xiv+ 309, Rs 450.

Politics of Development in Postcolonial India

While education in English has been advocated as a unifying and modernising force, it is also seen as a marker of imperialism and class privilege and a terrain of struggle among elite groups. Ruptures in such a class-divided educational system in turn shape specific debates over development, democracy and social change. Uneven empowerment that an education in English generates also has its fallout in an increasing polarisation, fracturing and violence against caste, gender and religious lines.

Preparing for Doha WTO Meeting

The upcoming WTO ministerial meeting at Doha will be considered to have been of benefit to developing countries if negotiations lead to cogent steps towards achieving a balance between liberalisation and particular development requirements. Third world countries will do well to forge broad alliances and workable coalitions.

Development under Imperfect Markets

Development Microeconomics by Pranab Bardhan and Christopher Udry; Oxford University Press, Oxford; 1999, pp vi+242, Rs 425.

ICTs in Rural Poverty Alleviation

Social structures are crucial in determining who is able to access any technology and use it beneficially. While making new information and communication technologies (ICTs) cheap will make them more accessible to the poor, there will be other factors which determine their impact. The current low penetration of ICTs is a reflection of the digital divide in overcoming which there is no way to bypass a confrontation of low educational levels, which itself is linked to landlessness.

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