ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

DevelopmentSubscribe to Development

‘Towards a More Prosperous and Plentiful Kerala’

The central proposition of this paper is that the Kerala economy must grow on a path that leverages the strengths of its ecosystem, both natural and social, in a way that engenders growth that is widely inclusive and inherently sustainable. The central concern must be whether and how far the various economic activities find a harmonious alignment with the differentia specifica of Kerala’s unique ecological wealth and social circumstances.

Debating the Power and Plight of Uttar Pradesh

From Lucknow to Lutyens: The Power and Plight of Uttar Pradesh by Abhigyan Prakash, Gurugram: HarperCollins Publishers, 2022; pp xxxii + 239, `599.

DCR33

In 2018, almost 10 years after the process was initiated in 2009, the development plan of Mumbai was sanctioned. The first draft of the plan, which sought to significantly reform urban planning in Mumbai, was scrapped in 2015. However, contrary to the widespread assumption that the first draft was rejected due to public opposition, this paper argues that a key factor behind the scrapping was to reform one of the central regulations of the 1991 Development Plan of Mumbai, Regulation 33, which provides development rights incentives and planning relaxations to property developers in Mumbai. Through an analysis of Mumbai’s development plan process, this paper offers a glimpse into the divergent values and interests of powerful groups, and how these interests are coordinated and reconciled in the city. The process reveals the extent to which real-estate capital shapes urban space and common sense of urban planning in Mumbai.

Income Convergence among the Districts of West Bengal

The study of the inter-district convergence of per capita incomes in any state or country is crucial to policy agenda as it exposes the scenario of real income distribution. The present paper examines inter-district convergence of per capita income in West Bengal using the neoclassical growth and panel unit root models; the second is an advanced approach compared to the first. The results in line with the two approaches show that the districts are not converging in terms of income; rather the districts are diverging between 1993 and 2014. It is an alarming knock to the state since divergence in income leads to rising inequality across districts; it will hamper the development of the state.

Economic Growth and Social Progress

Bangladesh at 50: Development and Challenges edited by S Narayan and Sreeradha Datta, Hyderabad: Orient BlackSwan, 2020; pp 263, `995.

Scheduled Caste Students’ Education and Post-matric Scholarships in Punjab

The issue of the massive dropouts of Scheduled Caste students from colleges and universities in Punjab is investigated in this article. For understanding the dropout rates of the SC students, it has been argued that one should take a cognisance of social and economic processes of the Punjabi society.

Disparities in Social Development in Maharashtra

This paper is based on the author’s MPhil thesis that was submitted to the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai under the supervision of M H Suryanarayana.
 

Mapping the Narrative of Environmental Law

Development of Environmental Laws in India by Kanchi Kohli and Manju Menon, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2021; pp 367, $41.99.

Unpacking the Black Box of Urban Governance in India

Governing Locally: Institutions, Policies and Implementation in Indian Cities by Babu Jacob and Suraj Jacob, Cambridge, New York, Melbourne, New Delhi and Singapore: Cambridge University Press, 2021; pp xxv + 293, $110 (hardback).

Adaptation and Political Ecology

The discourse on environmental sustainability and political ecology raises several questions on material inequality, poverty, increasing population and disproportionate allocation of resources, but we often overlook the critical question of what we need to sustain and to what extent? The lack of financial resources and its constant interplay with the developmental goals of the states have created economic uncertainties and provided us with a solid rationale to not act on curtailing carbon emissions. However, the relevance of ecological sustainability compels us to move beyond the instrumental reasoning of materialistic economic goals and strengthen the discourse on prioritising the subsistence rights of poor and marginalised societies. There is no doubt that the unprecedented vulnerability and inadequate coping capacity of least developed nations cause massive damage and hinder the prospects for risk aversion strategies simply because they cannot bear the cost of implementing adaptation policies.

Exploring Conflicts in Development: A Socio-Economic Perspective to the Major Forms of Land Dispossession in Post-Colonial India

This article introduces the problems caused by development projects (the major forms include hydel power, extractive mining, industrial development, and, currently, the special economic zones) in India. It seeks to explore the process of land appropriation, dispossession, and displacement faced by the poor and marginalised groups (Dalits and Adivasis) of the Indian society. This article is an effort to explore the historical cycles of displacement caused by such projects since independence and the active role of the government in addressing these scenarios. It further provides an overview of the various scholarly literature actively involved in this subject and how these projects ultimately lead to further marginalisation of the marginalised in the name of development.

Pages

Back to Top