ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Manipur’s Population Conundrum

This paper examines Manipur’s census statistics for the period between 1991 and 2011. It argues that conventional demographic factors cannot explain the abnormal population growth rates reported in parts of northern Manipur, and that the abnormalities in the headcount are instead associated with competition for seats in the state legislative assembly. Manipur’s experience is used to draw attention to systemic problems related to the inadequacy of metadata supplied by the census, lack of guidelines for correction of census data, impact of political interference on data quality, and cascading effect of errors in fundamental statistics, such as headcount, on other government statistics.

The Domicile Law of Jammu and Kashmir

The domicile law introduced in the newly created union territory of Jammu and Kashmir has aggravated the already deteriorating situation. The policy is a result of a historical, political and policy myopia of the current dispensation, which has failed to understand the significance of the earlier permanent residency laws for different communities across the erstwhile state of J&K. It has evoked fear of demographic change, loss of economic and cultural rights and has engineered profound changes in the political structure of the region.

Manipur and Mainstream Media

The clashes in Manipur over three controversial bills passed by the Manipur assembly last year extending the Inner Line Permit System have exposed not just the divisions within Manipuri society between the hill people and those living in the valley, but also the attitude of mainstream Indian media towards such conflicts in the North East. Instead of bringing out the historical underpinnings of the current conflict, the media has preferred to reduce the problem to a binary of two conflicting views.

Religion, Population Growth, Fertility and Family Planning Practice in India

The differential growth rates of Hindu and Muslim populations in India, as well as differences in acceptance of family planning practices, have always formed the subject of controversial debate. Based primarily on five national level surveys conducted between 1970 and 1998, this paper makes an attempt to analyse the differential growth rates of the Hindus and Muslims in India, their fertility levels and family planning practices observed by them.
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