ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

COVID 19 PandemicSubscribe to COVID 19 Pandemic

Morality and Mortality

The COVID-19 pandemic and its concomitant socio-economic shocks have severely affected the lives of sex workers and members of the transgender community. This article examines how the visibility of such sexual minorities in public spaces has been perceived as a threat to public decency and morality. It highlights the exclusionary pressures they face from the state and community, which have been exacerbated by COVID-19. Overcrowded housing, financial precarity, and a reduction in demand for their services place them at higher risk of infection and starvation, while political and social exclusion restricts their access to government services.

Prisons and the COVID-19 Pandemic

The vulnerability of our criminal justice system stands exposed in the second COVID -19 wave.

Falling behind the Curve Is Not an Option

India must jettison orthodox economics amidst the pandemic to protect employment and sustain a recovery.

COVID-19 and the Sugar Cane Cutter Migrants of Maharashtra

There is an urgent need to issue a policy resolution to ensure the social security and safety of sugar cane migrant labourers in the light of Covid-19 crisis. A failure to do so would lead to an absurd situation for the state, sugar industry, farmers and, more so, for the migrant labour.

An Alternate to Survey Methods to Measure Work from Home

In the times of COVID-19, it is desirable to know jobs that can be performed from home. A most common way to estimate jobs that can be performed from home is by carrying out surveys. However, unavailability of surveys in the home country compels researchers to estimate a work from home index using other countries’ surveys. This can potentially lead to large measurement errors. We believe that to overcome these challenges rating-based methodology provides a reasonable alternative which can easily be replicated in any country. Using rating-based methodology and statistical tools like inter-rater reliability we attempt to provide a robust index of WFH for India.

Politics and Economics of Vaccine Policy

India’s COVID -19 vaccine policy betrays a lack of vision and social responsibility.

Accumulation of Poor Health Infrastructure

India has to substantially scale up its health infrastructure to protect lives and livelihoods.

An Ongoing Pandemic

Domestic violence is widespread and deep-rooted in India and its ubiquity was highlighted prominently during the COVID-19 lockdown. This paper explores the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on domestic violence on women, the shifts in forms and intensity of this violence, and women’s responses through an analysis of cases of survivors that Swayam (a feminist organisation, headed by the author, working on the issue of violence against women in Kolkata) dealt with in the first half of 2020. It also evaluates the response of state agencies and the challenges faced and strategies used by civil society organisations, which, for years, have been active in working at providing and ensuring survivors’ access to support services.

COVID-19 and Women’s Labour Crisis: Reiterating an Inclusive Policy Response

The covid-19 pandemic in India has had an unequal impact on women in a number of ways. In terms of economic opportunity, it has been seen that more women lost jobs compared to men and fewer have been able to rejoin labour force. This is in the context of gendered labour markets where female labour force participation has been low and declining. This paper presents an analysis of the situation of women’s employment pre-lockdown and some indications on what the impact of Covid-19 could be, based on microstudies and other literature available. Further, the adequacy of the social protection and employment generation programmes of the government that are specifically aimed at improving female labour force participation is assessed.

The Continuing Saga of Women’s Work during COVID-19

This paper employs a social reproduction framework to argue that the two main institutions of capitalism—the markets and the state—have failed to adequately provide for the working people of India during the pandemic while fostering gender inequities. While the demand for gender equity in the domestic sphere and the workplace is not new, the pandemic further underscores its urgency.

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