ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Export-induced Loss in Employment and Earnings during the First Year of the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has been an unprecedented exogenous shock in the world economy unlike the global financial crisis in 2008, which was endogenously determined in the structure of capitalist financial market. Given the fact that Indian export sector significantly contributes to the Indian economy in general and employment in particular, it is worth examining how the Indian gross domestic product and exports changed in comparison with the world GDP and world exports respectively, in the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020–21 vis-à-vis the GFC in 2008. Which industries are affected the most, in terms of export loss, during this COVID-19 crisis? What have been the consequences of these falling export on employment and earnings in the Indian export sector? This study estimates that in the COVID-19 year 2020–21, Indian exports have fallen by `3.74 lakh crore, with a plausible loss of direct employment by 5.06 lakh and an estimated loss of earnings around `12.4 thousand crore across 85 commodities.

India–Gulf Labour Migration in the Aftermath of the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic-associated developments in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries have had direct and adverse impacts on low- and semi-skilled migrant workers, including job loss, wage cuts and earning loss. The crisis has in many ways also exposed fault lines in the existing Indian migration governance system in dealing with the vulnerabilities experienced by such migrants; these gaps are structural in nature and have been prevailing for a long period. The article delineates some of the major policy interventions that merit immediate attention to make the migration policy architecture “migrant-centric,” thereby enhancing the migration and developmental outcomes of future labour outflows.

COVID-19 Context and the Fifteenth Finance Commission

The objective of this paper is to understand the core recommendations of the Fifteenth Finance Commission in the context of COVID-19 pandemic. Given the macroeconomic uncertainties and rising fiscal needs, the commission focused on fiscal stability, equity and enhancement of fiscal space through higher borrowing with a fiscal exit plan for both union and states.

The COVID-19 Pandemic and Livelihood Loss

Significant variations in the rise in the unemployment rate across regions after the nationwide lockdown was enforced without any discrimination are noted. The reasons for such disparities are explored and migration is noted as an important factor. States with higher rates of migration and urbanisation, greater dependency on casual wage employment and non-agricultural employment witnessed hunger and an adverse impact on livelihood.

Re-exploring Earth Song

Music is a universal language that transcends borders, reinforces beliefs, has the power to become a catalyst for social change, and can possibly heal the world. Michael Jackson’s Earth Song, released in 1995, continues to be relevant today, and this essay explores the profound messages communicated urging viewers to adopt environmental rights as a way forward.

​Migrant Labour and Mobile Sensibilities

Mobile media is intricately interwoven into the public and private lives of migrant workers, bringing together multiple, previously divergent functions.

The Need for Saving Livelihoods for Saving Lives

The pandemic has led to the loss of many livelihoods due to the economic crisis. In order to curb the ongoing economic crisis from aggravating further, an international fiscal coordination worldwide is the need of the hour.

Queer Perspectives and COVID-19: Linking Queer Pasts to Queer Futures

While COVID-19 brings new challenges to the table, queer communities in India have a range of issues that remain unaddressed regardless of circumstance. This article is an attempt to articulate these conditions and provide context for how these change within the lockdown.

Combating the Twin Effects of Amphan and COVID-19 in Odisha: Understanding Coping Capacities and Strengthening Mechanisms

Odisha is currently coping with the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic and the aftermath of supercyclone Amphan. This double occurrence is the first such experience for the state. Dealing with the twin challenges of managing both the events is extremely complex. We know that the structural and non-structural disaster preparedness of Odisha is regarded as sound when compared with other states in India. However, the co-occurrence of COVID-19 and Amphan was disastrous for the people of Odisha, who largely live in its rural areas. Therefore, a broader policy context needs to be worked upon, after identifying the overlapping impact emerging from the twin disasters. This would aid in understanding the adaptation in the decision-making process as well as in identifying the interventions required at different levels. */ */

Disease, Stigma and a Culture of Profanity

Rooted in the stigmatisation of disease, our culture of profanity has wide-ranging social ramifications, including the potential to incite violence.

Claiming Inclusive Spaces in the Academia

“It has been an astonishing decade. Everything and nothing has changed” (Alexander 2020). Michelle Alexander’s assertion on the racial caste system and criminal justice system in America in the preface of the 10th anniversary edition of her 2010 seminal work The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness reveals how true her statement is for the pandemic year 2020 too. Alexander’s critique on the racial and social control in the United States (US) mirrors a similar control in the Indian society, in the aftermath of the innumerable lockdowns.

Flattening the Curve or Flattening Life? Public Service Announcements in the Pandemic

We employ a feminist political economy lens to explore the impact of the current pandemic on vulnerable communities in the United States and India. We examine three epidemiological public service announcements—social distancing, sheltering at home, handwashing—which are necessary to protect and save lives. However, we argue that the PSAs are deployed in an uneven social and economic terrain that deepen structural inequities across gender, caste, race, sexuality, and class. This expression of hierarchies during the pandemic also reflects the failure of global capitalism to provide for people and life. Ultimately, communities have stepped in with an emphasis on relationships of interdependence, and we see in these actions a potential way to form transnational feminist solidarity. */ */ */

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