ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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No Means No: Marital Rape Exception in India

T he Delhi High Court on 11 May 2022 handed down two separate verdicts on a batch of petitions challenging the marital rape exception under Section 375 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC). Justice Rajiv Shakdher, in his judgment, has held that the marital rape exception in favour of the husband is...

The Baby Arrived at a Natural Birth Centre

Natural birth centres promise comfortable and respectful pregnancy and childbirth services to well-to-do women who have suffered trauma, discomfort, and humiliation in hospitals.

Why Should the Marital Rape Exception be Removed?

The marital rape exception must be removed as it is no longer legally tenable in light of the Supreme Court decisions in various cases. Contrary to arguments that the central government has advanced repeatedly, these decisions hold that marriage does not mean there is irrevocable consent for sexual intercourse, and that a regressive practice cannot be used to ensure the stability of marriage.

Aziz Ansari, Mohammad Farooqui and the Dangerous Myth of a ‘Right' Way To Resist

Despite new robust legislation in place to protect women's rights, courts of law, in rape trials, still tend to lay emphasis on what the man presumed rather than what the woman communicated, and are over-willing to accept the man’s presumptions, however unreasonable they may be.

Manufacture of Consent?

This article explores several questions concerning the inclusion of hepatitis B vaccination under the universal immunisation programme in India, such as the prevalence of the disease in the population, cost-effectiveness and international experience. There are strong indications that the vaccine policy in India, rather than being determined by disease burden and demand, is increasingly driven by supply push, generated by industry and mediated by international organisations. The debate on hepatitis B in India underscores the need for a strong health information and disease surveillance system, local capability building and rigorous economic evaluation studies with regard to health policies.

Shalishi in West Bengal

Traditional community/village level dispute resolution systems still coexist with formal processes of justice and administration. The `shalishi' is one such method of arbitration in West Bengal that has been used by NGOs to intervene effectively in settling domestic violence cases. Shalishi scores over the more formal legal avenues of dispute resolution because of its informal set up. But deriving its legitimacy as it does from the conventional norms and values of the community it works in favour of keeping the family intact, often compromising feminist notions of empowerment.
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