ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Philosophical Reflections on Rendering of Disability and Gender in COVID-19 Era

This article presents philosophical reflections on Anita Ghai’s rendition of exclusion of persons with disabilities, its intersections with gender and class in COVID-19 times. Ghai’s paper critiques the liberal and enlightenment ideals of contract, autonomy, rationality and freedom that are exclusionary in nature, thus resulting in erasure or marginalisation of persons with disabilities. Through various narratives (some personal), this article takes us through the challenges faced by persons with disabilities due to the lockdown.

Gender Inequality in Well-being in India

This article proposes to measure functioning-based well-being, as proposed by Amartya Sen and others, for 28 states in India based on National Family Health Survey 3 (2005-06) data. Significant differences between states were found in terms of well-being and wealth indices. Overall, women were found to be far behind men in terms of well-being. The well-being of women was found to decline with age and when they were in larger families, unlike men. While upper-caste women were not found to be doing significantly better than Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe women, upper-caste men were better off. And the women in the northern mountainous regions were found to be doing better than women in the Indo-Gangetic plains. However, the well-being of both men and women was found to be significantly related to the wealth they possessed.

Human Capital or Human Development?

This paper compares human capital theory with the capability approach and lays out the problems with the theory. As a knowledge paradigm for education and development, it finds the theory wanting. However, it has remained the foundation for sectoral work in education and health by international financial institutions. The paper spells out the problems, historically, with World Bank lending in the education sector, some of which follow from human capital theory, while others follow from a broader neoliberal agenda. It concludes by delineating the foundational elements of an alternative knowledge paradigm for ?education for all?, based on the capability approach and its extension.
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