ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Artificial intelligenceSubscribe to Artificial intelligence

Is Decent Work Elusive under Globalisation and 4IR?

The global production chain has entered the phase of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The emerging countries are not immune from the trend of technology adoption either through domestic or international competition. Excessive use of technology has subdued the possibility of creating enough decent jobs for India and other emerging countries. The weakening relationship between economic and employment growth led by intense global competition and technology penetration is likely to complicate the decent employment agenda.

The Macro Frames of Microwork

Based on a qualitative study of women microworkers on Amazon Mechanical Turk, this paper explores the gendered modus operandi of global platform capitalism. For women from households negotiating caste and class status in small-town South India, digital labour platforms like AMT are the optimal choice; an answer to both economic necessity and familial validation. Women must, however, endure the platform’s coercive disciplining, striving to meet its unknowable metrics. With the pandemic, even as they are forced to contend with the oppressive precarity of digital labour—reducing job availability, falling pay, longer hours and the risk of suspension—work on AMT, paradoxically, becomes non-negotiable. The artificial intelligence-based regimes of the platform economy urgently need a norm shift towards gender equality and redistributive justice.

Interrogating the AI Hype: A Situated Politics of Machine Learning in Indian Healthcare

Though they may seem as such, AI technologies are not merely technical systems. Rather, they are constitutive, and indicative, of the sociopolitical contexts that they are situated in. This is part of a six-article series on questions surrounding data, privacy, artificial intelligence, among others. You can read the introduction here .

Driverless Vehicles and Their Future in India

As driverless vehicles become a reality, there is a need to understand what such technology could mean for urban transportation in India. Even as the penetration of autonomous vehicle technologies may be limited in India, and its labour market and land use implications few, it could prove to be a highly efficient low-cost urban transport alternative compared to the hugely expensive metro systems of today.
Back to Top