ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Andhra PradeshSubscribe to Andhra Pradesh

Life in a Special Economic Zone

Special economic zones in India continue to be seen as vehicles for social and economic development. The article describes how resident communities of an SEZ in Sri City, Andhra Pradesh, experienced a series of livelihood transformations that were mediated strongly by capabilities and aspirations. Divergent social and economic outcomes were created for respondents living in and navigating through a transition–transformation–aspiration continuum. The SEZ creation legitimised precarity by engendering casual, insecure, and unprotected labour relationships. The article suggests that SEZ performance be evaluated by metrics that incorporate an explicit focus on the enhancement of capabilities.

The Land Pooling Scheme in Andhra Pradesh

The Land Pooling Scheme employed by the state of Andhra Pradesh has procured nearly 33,000 acres of agricultural land to implement the master plan of its new capital city Amaravati. This article explores the intervention made by the LPS as an alternative to the Right to Fair Compensation and Transparency in Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement Act, 2013, and the various discourses associated with its implementation in AP.

Experiences with Government-sponsored Health Insurance Schemes in Indian States

The implications of expanding government-sponsored health insurance schemes in India are analysed from a fiscal perspective. The experiences of two of the earliest and largest GSHI schemes of the country implemented in Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu are examined. The results suggest that the expansion of the GSHI schemes may skew expenditure away from primary and secondary care towards tertiary care if the fiscal space is limited. A competitive public health system may help in containing costs and the corresponding fiscal burden. The effectiveness of public spending through such schemes is ambiguous.

Shifting Capitals from Amaravati to Vizag: Disabling Growth Engines and Social Justice

This article explores arguments in favour of and against the building of a single new capital as opposed to multiple capitals, in the state of Andhra Pradesh. Further, it probes various aspects central to this issue—the Sivaramakrishnan Committee on suitability of potential capital cities, decentralisation and the feasibility of three capitals, unbalanced development across Andhra Pradesh on ground and in popular culture, and prior growth models for Amaravati. This article argues the need for growth engines to eradicate poverty, similar to that in united Andhra Pradesh of the 1990s and 2000s. With Hyderabad being the capital of Telangana, Amaravati is where the fledgling state's identity and growth engine have to be forged afresh. This article questions the ability of the current state government in building three capitals post-COVID-19, in light of the drastically strained finances. This must be seen alongside plans for creating at least a dozen new districts that would require high administrative expenses. */ */

What Are the Implications of the English-language Education Policy of the Andhra Pradesh Government?

Led by the Yuvajana Sramika Rythu Congress Party government, Andhra Pradesh has recently announced its decision to offer English as the medium of instruction in government-run schools across the state. While supporters of the move hail it as a landmark decision to correct the historical injustice meted out to the marginalised, critics fear the potential threat to Telugu language and culture.

Champion of Civic Politics: Keshav Rao Jadhav (1933-2018)

Keshav Rao Jadhav’s role as an individual and as rights activist was immense. After his death on 16 June 2018, Telangana has lost a great champion of civil and subaltern society activism and an optimist who instilled confidence and hope among the youth and students that change is possible provided we direct our effort to and strive for it.

Pawan Kalyan's Inconsistent Political Agenda Might Make Janasena Party Come Undone

Pawan Kalyan’s political party, the Janasena Party has no clear agenda and has been inconsistent in taking concrete steps. It looks unlikely that the political outfit can succeed solely based on Pawan Kalyan’s on-screen prowess.

Developmental Rhetoric, Uprooted Lives

Any developmental activity can be meaningful only when the dispossessed and displaced people are taken care of and adequately rehabilitated. Nevertheless, their basic rights to life and decent rehabilitation are often violated by governments and project authorities. Such violations are particularly evident in the Gundlakamma Reservoir Project in Andhra Pradesh.

Following the Government’s Urban Footsteps

Will the inauguration of the Interim Government Complex in the new capital villages of Andhra Pradesh spur newer, better forms of urban growth? Our sixth photo essay from the transforming land of Amravati, the new capital of Andhra Pradesh.

Vector Control Operations to Deal with Malaria

Although India had some successes in controlling malaria from the time of independence, it still faces a substantial socio-economic burden from this disease. This paper presents a case study of a highly endemic primary health centre with an annual parasite incidence of 30.9 in the tribal regions of Andhra Pradesh. It reviews the various operations involved in vector control methods like bed nets, insecticide spraying and anti-larval operations. Based on the data available with the health functionaries and household level surveys, it makes operational suggestions to improve the efficacy of control measures. It finds that the current focus is heavily skewed towards surveillance for malaria-affected patients with inadequate attention for vector control methods of malaria prevention. Ensuring the adoption of vector control methods by the community will yield rich dividends in curtailing the malarial transmission process.

Making of Amaravati

This paper examines Amaravati, the proposed greenfield capital of the bifurcated Andhra Pradesh state, against the backdrop of the rise of urban mega-projects across Asia, and the tendencies towards land speculation they have unleashed in Indian cities. It offers a critique of the land pooling mechanisms as they have played out on the ground in the affected villages. It argues that voluntary land pooling on such a large scale has been made possible through a coordinated use of coercive tactics and legal measures, including the land ordinance of the Government of India, which was re-promulgated three times and provided a credible fallback in the AP government's dealings with farmers. Land pooling also facilitated a regime of co-option with absentee landowners aligning, on caste lines, with the ruling party.

Andhra Pradesh's Master Plan for Its New Capital

Amaravati, the planned new capital of Andhra Pradesh, is to be set up in a highly fertile, multi-cropped area in the Guntur-Krishna belt where the water table is just 15 to 20 feet below the surface. The Government of Andhra Pradesh has been aggressively pursuing land pooling through a series of not-too-friendly measures to acquire land for the capital which will be located in a low- to medium-risk flood area. Where the Singapore consultancy's master plan for the new city, Amaravati, falters is in not visualising the need to accommodate low-income residents and the informal sector in the new capital, and in its exaggerated projections of employment generation in the information technology sector.

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