ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

AgricultureSubscribe to Agriculture

How to Make Budgets with a Dearth of Data

Given that the reliability of official data has come into question, there is no way to understand the full extent of the issues that various sectors are facing without accurate data.

How Can We Manage Drought Without Water-Use Data?

Measures to mitigate drought only seek to address its effects, rather than finding ways to prevent it.

Indian Democracy Has Failed to Advance Redistributive Reforms for Marginalised Groups

Class exploitation and caste oppression in rural India have to be put squarely at the centre of any oppositional agenda for redistribution, recognition, and progressive change.

How Can Agriculture Be Made 'Cool' For India's Youth?

This article discusses the waning interests of rural youth in agriculture and suggests interventions to mitigate this issue.

State, Community and the Agrarian Transition in Arunachal Pradesh

Following the rapid and uneven integration with the capitalist economy, the local economies and institutional mechanisms of the indigenous communities of Arunachal Pradesh have been transformed in multiple and complex ways. With the commercialisation of agriculture and the gradual emergence of private property rights, the community-based institutions for natural resource management and conflict resolutions are undergoing a multilevel transformation. This is mediated through the interactions among community, market and state institutions. With the expansion of the non-agricultural economy, a powerful class of local elites has attempted to extract rent through a variety of means, often using their membership of local communities and access to state institutions to safeguard their interests, against the backdrop of the ethnic competition between different ethnic groups.

Why Are Our Farmers Angry?

EPW Engage contextualises the agrarian crisis and farmer protests in India with this reading list.

A Struggle Far from Over

The kisan long march, which took place in March 2018, is the most noteworthy agitation by farmers in Maharashtra in recent times. However, beyond the demands of complete loan waivers and fair prices for farm produce, the march is the manifestation of deep-seated and burgeoning structural problems within the agricultural sector that successive governments have failed to address.

Are Gold Loans Glittering for Agriculture?

Credit is essential for small and marginal farmers in India, whose low incomes limit savings, making them more vulnerable to several risks. Priority sector lending norms have channelled more formal credit to this sector. The interest subvention scheme for short-term crop loans makes formal credit more economical for farmers. However, there are issues of accessibility, most notably arising out of difficulties in presenting documentation, giving rise to a prevalence in the use of gold/jewellery as collateral. Loan data from three districts in Karnataka has highlighted some important lessons. The use of gold tends to exclude poorer farmers from availing all the benefits of the scheme, and poses issues of accessibility to formal credit. Digitisation of land records and farmer information, coupled with reduced recognition of gold loans in priority sector lending can be valuable to the Indian agriculture sector.

Death in the Midst of Plenty

There remain misconceptions regarding farmer suicides. There is a need to set right these erroneous ideas based on scientific studies that have been conducted seeking to devise solutions to address the prevailing crisis of the peasantry in Punjab.

Draft Pesticide Management Bill is Out of Sync With the Agrarian Political Economy

The bill ignores ground realities of sale and consumption of agrichemicals. Any bill genuinely concerned about agrichemicals management must begin with the recognition that much of agriculture is plagued by a deep economic, ecological, and cultural crisis. The government must go back to the drawing board and reformulate the very objectives of the bill.

The Convergence of Peasant Struggles Worldwide

A plethora of problems face Southern and Northern family agricultures in the current neo-liberal era of financial capital domination worldwide, and has paved the way for the revival of peasant struggles for their social emancipation and legitimate right of access to land and food. Obviously, such struggles also concern all categories of workers and people because what is at stake is the challenge to reach food sovereignty and to build our societies at the local, national and global levels, on the principles of social justice, equality and real democracy.

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